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The mathematics skills of school children: how does England compare to the high performing east Asian jurisdictions?

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  • John Jerrim

    ()
    (University of London)

  • Álvaro Choi

    ()
    (Universitat de Barcelona & IEB)

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    Abstract

    English policymakers have been disappointed with children’s performance on TIMSS and PISA, particularly in comparison to the results of young people from East Asia. In this paper we provide new insight into the England – East Asia gap by considering how cross-national differences in math test scores change between ages 10 and 16. Our results suggest that, although average math test scores are higher in East Asian countries, this gap does not increase between ages 10 and 16. Thus, reforming the secondary school system may not be the most effective way for England to ‘catch up’. Rather earlier intervention, during pre-school and primary school, may be needed instead.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB) in its series Working Papers with number 2013/12.

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    Length: 41 pages
    Date of creation: 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:2013/6/doc2013-12

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    Related research

    Keywords: PISA; TIMSS; educational policy; primary education; secondary education;

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    1. Giorgio Brunello & Guglielmo Weber & Christoph Weiss, 2012. "Books are forever: Early life conditions, education and lifetime earnings in Europe," ISER Discussion Paper 0842, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. John Jerrim, 2012. "The socio-economic gradient in teenagers' literacy skills: how does England compare to other countries?," DoQSS Working Papers 12-04, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
    3. Gabriela Schütz & Heinrich W. Ursprung & Ludger Wö�mann, 2008. "Education Policy and Equality of Opportunity," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 279-308, 05.
    4. Hanushek, Eric A. & Wößmann, Ludger, . "The Economics of International Differences in Educational Achievement," Chapters in Economics, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    5. Giorgina Brown & John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf & Robert Waldmann, 2007. "International surveys of educational achievement: how robust are the findings?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(3), pages 623-646.
    6. World Bank, 2012. "World Development Indicators 2012," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6014, October.
    7. Eric Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2008. "The Role of Cognitive Skills in Economic Development," Discussion Papers 07-034, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    8. repec:hal:psewpa:halshs-00646594 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Andreas Ammermueller & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Peer Effects in European Primary Schools: Evidence from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 315-348, 07.
    10. Ferreira, Francisco H. G. & Gignoux, Jérémie, 2011. "The Measurement of Educational Inequality: Achievement and Opportunity," IZA Discussion Papers 6161, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Robert J. Barro, 2001. "Human Capital and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 12-17, May.
    12. Zoltan Hermann & Daniel Horn, 2011. "How inequality of opportunity and mean student performance are related? - A quantile regression approach using PISA data," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1124, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
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