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Why do educated mothers matter? A model of parental help

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Author Info

  • Luciano Canova

    ()
    (Enrico Mattei School)

  • Alessandro Vaglio

    ()
    (University of Bergamo)

Abstract

This paper investigates the role performed by mothers in affecting their childrens’ performance at school. The article develops firstly a theoretical model in which household (parent - child pair) is treated as an individual, whose utility depends both on the performance at school of the student and on consumption. The model focuses on the different possibilities through which help of mothers may affect pupil’s performance both in terms of time devoted to supervision and spillover effects. Empirical evidence then, using PISA 2006 and focusing on Italian case, shows that education of mothers is an issue when interacted with her occupational status. Highly educated mothers have a positive impact on students’ score only when they are highly qualifed in the job market.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB) in its series Working Papers with number 2011/3.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:2011/3/doc2011-3

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Related research

Keywords: Education; PISA; quantile regressions; parental help;

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References

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  1. Fuchs, Thomas & Wößmann, Ludger, 2007. "What accounts for international differences in student performance? A re-examination using PISA data," Munich Reprints in Economics 20303, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  2. Chiara Pronzato, 2008. "Why Educated Mothers don’t make Educated Children? A Statistical Study in the Intergenerational Transmission of Schooling," Discussion Papers 563, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
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Cited by:
  1. Antonio Manresa & Ferran Sancho, 2012. "Leontief versus Ghosh: two faces of the same coin," Working Papers XREAP2012-18, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Oct 2012.
  2. Anna Castañer & Mª Mercè Claramunt, 2014. "Optimal stop-loss reinsurance: a dependence analysis," Working Papers XREAP2014-04, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Apr 2014.

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