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How Much Do Teachers Earn?

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  • Claudia Piras
  • William D. Savedoff
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    Abstract

    In the continuing debate over how to improve education systems, many people argue that teachers` salaries need to be increased. This paper seeks to establish a reliable method for analyzing the issue using household survey data from Bolivia.

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    File URL: http://www.iadb.org/research/pub_hits.cfm?pub_id=WP-375&pub_file_name=pubWP-375.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4122.

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    Date of creation: Sep 1998
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    Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4122

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    1. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    2. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong Wha, 1996. "International Measures of Schooling Years and Schooling Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 218-23, May.
    3. Panagides, Alexis & Patrinos, Harry Anthony & DEC, 1994. "Union - nonunion wage differentials in the developing world : a case study of Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1269, The World Bank.
    4. Ransom, Michael R. & Megdal, Sharon Bernstein, 1993. "Sex differences in the academic labor market in the affirmative action era," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 21-43, March.
    5. Verdugo, Richard R. & Schneider, Jeffrey M., 1994. "Gender inequality in female-dominated occupation: The earnings of male and female teachers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 251-264, September.
    6. Kenny, Lawrence W. & Denslow, David Jr., 1980. "Compensating differentials in teachers' salaries," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 198-207, March.
    7. Psacharopoulos, George & Valenzuela, Jorge & Arends, Mary, 1996. "Teacher salaries in Latin America: A review," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 401-406, October.
    8. Bee, Malcolm & Dolton, Peter, 1995. "The Remuneration of School Teachers: Time Series and Cross-Section Evidence," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 63(1), pages 1-22, March.
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