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Globalization and its disconnects

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  • Simon Teitel

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Abstract

Globalization, defined in economic terms as the phenomenon of increased integration of the world economy, generates strong reactions due to some negative effects of the growth of international trade, the internationalization of industrial production, and unrestricted cross-border capital flows, while the overall mobility of labor remains quite limited. Evidence on the growth of international trade and factor mobility is reviewed and analyzed, and problems affecting developed and developing countries are detected. Policy measures to alleviate some of the dislocations from increased globalization are discussed, and some measures recommended to avoid social and political disruptions.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ICER - International Centre for Economic Research in its series ICER Working Papers with number 07-2002.

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Length: 56 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:icr:wpicer:07-2002

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Keywords: Globalization; international trade; capital flows; labor mobility; technology; intellectual property rights;

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  1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1999. "International Institutions for Reducing Global Financial Instability," NBER Working Papers 7265, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1998. "The New Regionalism," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(449), pages 1149-61, July.
  3. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Symposium on Globalization in Perspective: An Introduction," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 3-8, Fall.
  4. Maurice Obstfeld, 1998. "The Global Capital Market: Benefactor or Menace?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 9-30, Fall.
  5. Kyle Bagwell & Robert W. Staiger, 2001. "The WTO as a Mechanism for Securing Market Access Property Rights: Implications for Global Labor and Environmental Issues," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 69-88, Summer.
  6. anonymous, 1985. "Developments in the international economy," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 48, febuary.
  7. Sebastian Edwards, 1999. "How Effective Are Capital Controls?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 65-84, Fall.
  8. Richard N. Cooper, 1999. "Should Capital Controls be Banished?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 30(1), pages 89-142.
  9. Barry J. Eichengreen, 1999. "Toward a New International Financial Architecture: A Practical Post-Asia Agenda," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 51.
  10. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 1998. "Globalization, Labor Markets and Policy Backlash in the Past," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 51-72, Fall.
  11. Barry P. Bosworth & Susan M. Collins, 1999. "Capital Flows to Developing Economies: Implications for Saving and Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 30(1), pages 143-180.
  12. Robert C. Feenstra, . "Integration Of Trade And Disintegration Of Production In The Global Economy," Department of Economics 98-06, California Davis - Department of Economics.
  13. Teitel, Simon, 1984. "Technology creation in semi-industrial economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1-2), pages 39-61.
  14. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
  15. Teitel, Simon, 1981. "Towards an understanding of technical change in semi-industrialized countries," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 127-147, July.
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