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The Occupational Career Paths of Australian Tradesmen

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  • Elizabeth Webster

    ()
    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Kelly Jarvis

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper asks whether the high rates of both unqualified tradespeople and attrition of qualified tradespeople from trade work necessarily represent inefficiencies in the skill acquisition process for the skilled trades. We argue that it is possible that there are three streams of trade workers - a lower stream, which requires the least academic and vocational skills and embodies short and flat experience profiles; a higher stream which demands more academic and vocational expertise and steeper experience profiles and a third, more traditional trade stream which lies in-between. This view is supported by persistent patterns in tradesmen's career paths. Polarisation into the highest and lowest streams appears to be increasing over time. If valid, these findings suggest that there should be several tiers of training for the trade labour markets.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne in its series Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series with number wp2003n14.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: May 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2003n14

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Postal: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia
Phone: +61 3 8344 2100
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Web page: http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/
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  1. Greenhalgh, Christine & Stewart, Mark, 1982. "The effects and Determinants of Training," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 213, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  2. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-22, February.
  3. Greenhalgh, Christine & Mavrotas, George, 1994. "The Role of Career Aspirations and Financial Constraints in Individual Access to Vocational Training," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(4), pages 579-604, October.
  4. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
  5. Greenhalgh, C. & Mavrotas, G., 1991. "Job Training, New Technology and Labour Turnover," Economics Series Working Papers 99121, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Nickell, Stephen, 1982. "The Determinants of Occupational Success in Britain," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 43-53, January.
  7. Greenhalgh, C & Longland, M & Bosworth, D, 2001. "Technological Activity and Employment in a Panel of UK Firms," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(3), pages 260-82, August.
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