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Dynamic Relationships in the Australian Labour Market: Heterogeneity and State Dependence

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  • Stephen Knights

    (Balliol College Oxford, UK)

  • Mark Harris

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Joanne Loundes

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

In this study, individual labour market dynamics are analysed using the Australian Longitudinal Survey. A random utility framework for analysing discrete choices is adopted. In this context, a model incorporating a state dependent relationship between employment outcomes is estimated. The influence on individual employment outcomes of additional variables including education, gender and unemployment benefits is also investigated. It is found that, even after controlling for observable and unobservable differences between individuals, there is strong evidence of state dependence. In certain key respects, the findings of this study differ markedly from those of other Australian labour market studies. It is expected that these findings will provide further insight into the causes of contemporary unemployment, and may constitute further evidence of a 'scarring' effect of unemployment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne in its series Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series with number wp2000n06.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: May 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2000n06

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Postal: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia
Phone: +61 3 8344 2100
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Web page: http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/
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Cited by:
  1. Jeff Borland & David Johnston, 2010. "How Does a Worker's Labour Market History Affect Job Duration?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2010n06, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  2. Victoria Prowse, 2005. "State Dependence in a Multi-state Model of Employment," Economics Papers 2005-W20, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  3. Ahn, Taehyun, 2012. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women and the Role of Part-time Work: the Case of Korea," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 53(1), pages 25-38, June.
  4. Blázquez Cuesta, Maite & Budría, Santiago, 2012. "Unemployment Persistence: How Important Are Non-Cognitive Skills?," IZA Discussion Papers 6654, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Prowse, Victoria, 2005. "State Dependence in a Multi-State Model of Employment Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 1623, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Mavromaras, Kostas G. & Polidano, Cain, 2011. "Improving the Employment Rates of People with Disabilities through Vocational Education," IZA Discussion Papers 5548, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Jeff Borland & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2003. "How Do Administrative Arrangements Affect Exit from Unemployment Payments? The Case of the Job Seeker Diary in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2003n27, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  8. Cain Polidano & Ha Vu, 2012. "Labour market impacts from disability onset," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2012-583, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  9. Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2011. "Scarring Effects of the First Labor Market Experience," IZA Discussion Papers 5565, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2004. "Scarring effects of the first labour market experience: A sibling based analysis," Working Paper Series 2004:14, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  11. Lundin, Andreas & Hemmingsson, Tomas, 2013. "Adolescent predictors of unemployment and disability pension across the life course – a longitudinal study of selection in 49 321 Swedish men," Working Paper Series 2013:25, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  12. Taehyun Ahn, 2010. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women and the Role of Part-Time Work: Evidence from Korea," Working Papers 1003, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University.
  13. Cain Polidano & Ha Vu, 2012. "Labour Market Impacts from Disability Onset," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n22, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  14. Bruce Chapman & Matthew Gray, 2004. "Youth Unemployment: Aggregate Incidence and Consequences for Individuals," Labor and Demography 0408001, EconWPA.
  15. Yin King Fok & Rosanna Scutella & Roger Wilkins, 2013. "The Low-Pay No-Pay Cycle: Are There Systematic Differences across Demographic Groups?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n32, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  16. Jeff Borland & Yi-Ping Tseng, 2004. "Does 'Work for the Dole' Work?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2004n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  17. Zucchelli, E.; & Harris, M.; & Zhao, X.;, 2012. "Ill-health and transitions to part-time work and self-employment among older workers," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  18. Jarvis, Lovell S. & Cancino, Jose P. & Bervejillo, Jose E., 2005. "The Effect of Foot and Mouth Disease on Trade and Prices in International Beef Markets," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19424, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  19. Biewen, Martin & Steffes, Susanne, 2010. "Unemployment persistence: Is there evidence for stigma effects?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 188-190, March.

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