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The Effect of Work-family Balance Policy on Childbirth and Women's Work

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  • Mizuochi, Masaaki
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    Abstract

    This study examines the effect of Japan's 2005 work-family legislation?the Act on Advancement of Measures to Support Raising Next-Generation Children? on childbirth and women's job continuity. This Act requires firms to support their employees in bearing and rearing children. In particular, it helps working women to continue their careers, thereby reducing the opportunity cost of having children and boosting childbirth. Although the Act requires large firms to support their employees in this regard, it merely recommends that smalland medium-sized firms do so. In consequence, it potentially has greater influence on employees of large firms than on those of small- and medium-sized firms. Using this quasiexperimental condition, we determine the Act's effect by comparing data from before and after its implementation in firms of various sizes. Difference-in-differences estimation results demonstrate that the Act has a positive effect on the joint probability of childbirth and women's job continuity

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/23134/1/DP575.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series Discussion Paper Series with number 575.

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    Length: 22 p.
    Date of creation: Jul 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hit:hituec:575

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    Keywords: Childbirth; Women’s job continuity; Work-family balance policy; Quasi-experiment;

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    1. Junsen Zhang & Jason Quan & Peter van Meerbergen, 1994. "The Effect of Tax-Transfer Policies on Fertility in Canada, 1921-88," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(1), pages 181-201.
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    9. Robert Mcnown & Cristóbal Ridao-cano, 2004. "The Effect of Child Benefit Policies on Fertility and Female Labor Force Participation in Canada," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 237-254, 04.
    10. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1998. "The Economic Consequences Of Parental Leave Mandates: Lessons From Europe," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(1), pages 285-317, February.
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    12. Lundin, Daniela & Mörk, Eva & Öckert, Björn, 2008. "How far can reduced childcare prices push female labour supply?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 647-659, August.
    13. Susan L. Averett & Leslie A. Whittington, 2001. "Does Maternity Leave Induce Births?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 403-417, October.
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