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Impacts of Institutional Changes in Cambodia under the Pol Pot Regime

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  • Kogure, Katsuo
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    Abstract

    This paper presents an econometric analysis of impacts of the communist revolution by the Khmer Rouge (1975-’79) in Cambodia on economic behaviors of survivors after 1979. Specifically, we compare forced marriages in the Pol Pot regime with regular marriages after its collapse, and make econometric evaluations of their educational investments for children. Our econometric results are interpreted as meaning that forced-marriage couples invested less in their children’s education than the regular-marriage couples. We consider those results, by reflecting upon social and political structures of Cambodia under and after the Pol Pot regime.

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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/25636/1/wp2012-13.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series CEI Working Paper Series with number 2012-13.

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    Length: 32, 13 p.
    Date of creation: Mar 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hit:hitcei:2012-13

    Note: March 2013
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    Keywords: educational investments for children; family organizations; institutions; norms; political economy; violence;

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    1. Mamoru Kaneko & J. Jude Kline, 2006. "Inductive Game Theory: A Basic Scenario," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 06-A001, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
    2. Guido M. Imbens & Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2008. "Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation," NBER Working Papers 14251, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Nathan Nunn, 2009. "The Importance of History for Economic Development," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 65-92, 05.
    4. Abhijit Banerjee & Lakshmi Iyer, 2010. "History Institutions and Economic Performance: The Legacy of Colonial Land Tenure Systems in India," Working Papers id:2811, eSocialSciences.
    5. Kaivan Munshi & Mark Rosenzweig, 2006. "Traditional Institutions Meet the Modern World: Caste, Gender, and Schooling Choice in a Globalizing Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1225-1252, September.
    6. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1.
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