Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Living Within Conflicts: Risk of Violence and Livelihood Portfolios

Contents:

Author Info

  • Marc Rockmore

    ()

Abstract

This paper provides a comprehensive view of household responses to insecurity by examining chances along the extensive and intensive margins of livelihoods during a conflict. In particular, it examines how insecurity affects both the choice of activities and the composition of associated livestock and crop portfolios. Uniquely, I rely on a sample of over 690,000 rural households, accounting for 75 percent of all rural households in Northern Uganda. Overall, the analysis suggests that shifts in the composition and levels of assets are one of the primarily paths by which conflict-risk lowers welfare.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.hicn.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/HiCN-WP-121.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 121.

as in new window
Length: 54 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:121

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.hicn.org

Related research

Keywords: Welfare and Poverty; Economic Development; Conflict; Risk;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Marijke Verpoorten, 2007. "Household coping in war- and peacetime: cattle sales in Rwanda, 1991-2001," Center for Economic Studies - Discussion papers, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën ces0727, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën.
  2. Nathan Fiala, 2009. "The Consequences of Forced Displacement in Northern Uganda," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 65, Households in Conflict Network.
  3. Tom Bundervoet, 2006. "Livestock, Activity Choices and Conflict: Evidence from Burundi," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 24, Households in Conflict Network.
  4. Menon, Nidhiya & Rodgers, Yana van der Meulen, 2011. "War and women's work : evidence from the conflict in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 5745, The World Bank.
  5. Deininger, Klaus, 2003. "Causes and consequences of civil strife - micro-level evidence from Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3045, The World Bank.
  6. McKay, Andrew & Loveridge, Scott, 2005. "Exploring The Paradox Of Rwandan Agricultural Household Income And Nutritional Outcomes In 1990 And 2000," Staff Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 11582, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Achyuta Adhvaryu & James Fenske, 2013. "War, resilience and political engagement in Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2013-08, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  2. Achyuta Adhvaryu & James Fenske, 2014. "Conflict and the Formation of Political Beliefs in Africa," HiCN Working Papers, Households in Conflict Network 164, Households in Conflict Network.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:121. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alia Aghajanian) or () The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask to update the entry or send us the correct address or () or ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.