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Schooling, Violent Conflict and Gender in Burundi

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  • Philip Verwimp

    ()
    (ECARES and Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management, Université Libre de Bruxelles)

  • Jan Van Bavel

    ()
    (Interface Demography, Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Abstract

Next to the taking of lives and the destruction of infrastructure, violent conflict also affects the long-term growth path of a country by its effect on human capital accumulation. This paper investigates the effect of exposure to violent conflict on the completion of primary schooling. We use a nationwide household survey that collected detailed education, migration, gender and wealth data and combine this with secondary sources on the location and timing of the conflict. Depending on specification we find that the odds to complete primary schooling for a child exposed to the violence declined by 40 to 50% compared to a non-exposed child. The schooling of boys from non-poor households is affected most by conflict, followed by boys and girls from poor households. The schooling of girls from nonpoor households is least affected. Forced displacement is found to be one of the channels through which the impact is felt. We perform robustness checks for our results.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 101.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:101

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Cited by:
  1. Domingues, Patrick, 2011. "Civil War Exposure And School Enrolment:Evidence From The Mozambican Civil War," NEPS Working Papers, Network of European Peace Scientists 1/2011, Network of European Peace Scientists.

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