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Intergenerational Transmission of Education among Immigrant Mothers and their Daughters in Sweden

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  • Niknami, Susan

    ()
    (Swedish Institute for Social Research, Stockholm University)

Abstract

This study uses extensive Swedish register data to analyze the intergenerational transmission of education between immigrant mothers and their daughters. The results show that the transmission is only slightly lower among daughters of immigrant mothers compared to native daughters. The educational relationship between mothers and daughters is further found to be nonlinear. For both groups, the intergenerational link is weaker among daughters of poorly educated mothers. Moreover, the average transmission differs across immigrant groups but these differences can be explained partly by dissimilar maternal educational backgrounds. In addition, the differences between women with an immigrant background and native women have decreased across the two generations. Finally, the educational attainment of an immigrant group has a positive but weak impact on daughters’ educational outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Swedish Institute for Social Research in its series Working Paper Series with number 7/2010.

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Length: 68 pages
Date of creation: 09 Aug 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sofiwp:2010_007

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Keywords: Immigrants; education; intergenerational transmission;

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Cited by:
  1. Grönqvist, Hans & Johansson, Per & Niknami, Susan, 2012. "Income Inequality and Health: Lessons from a Refugee Residential Assignment Program," IZA Discussion Papers 6554, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Richter, André & Robling, Per Olof, 2013. "Multigenerational e ffects of the 1918-19 influenza pandemic in Sweden," Working Paper Series, Swedish Institute for Social Research 5/2013, Swedish Institute for Social Research.

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