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Islam and the Institutions of a Free Society: Many Problems, Little Hope

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Abstract

The rule of law, constitutional democracy, and market economy are taken as the core institutions of free societies. After arguing that shared values heavily influence institutions, it is asked whether Islamic values are conducive to those institutions. The values are ascertained via the economic ethics of Islam as lived today and the attitudes of some Muslim populations via the analysis of a recent opinion poll. Neither the values nor the attitudes of Muslim societies seem particularly supportive of the institutions of a free society.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Ratio Institute in its series Ratio Working Papers with number 43.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: 17 May 2004
Date of revision: 20 Dec 2004
Publication status: Forthcoming in The Independent Review.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0043

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Postal: The Ratio Institute, P.O. Box 5095, SE-102 42 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: 08-441 59 00
Fax: 08-441 59 29
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Web page: http://www.ratio.se/
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Keywords: Islam; Values; Culture; New Institutional economics; rule of law; constitutional democracy; market economy;

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  1. Berggren, Niclas, 2003. "The Benefits of Economic Freedom: A Survey," Ratio Working Papers 4, The Ratio Institute.
  2. Feld, Lars P. & Voigt, Stefan, 2003. "Economic growth and judicial independence: cross-country evidence using a new set of indicators," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 497-527, September.
  3. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Trust in Large Organizations," NBER Working Papers 5864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. repec:cto:journl:v:18:y:1998:i:2:p: is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Regina T. Riphahn & Oliver Serfling, 2002. "Neue Evidenz zum Schulerfolg von Zuwanderern in der zweiten Generation in Deutschland," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 71(2), pages 230-248.
  6. Adam Przeworski & Fernando Limongi, 1993. "Political Regimes and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 51-69, Summer.
  7. Timur Kuran, 1997. "Islam and Underdevelopment: An Old Puzzle Revisited," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 153(1), pages 41-, March.
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