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Service motives and profit incentives among physicans

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Author Info

  • Godager, Geir

    ()
    (Institute of Health Management and Health Economics)

  • Iversen, Tor

    ()
    (Institute of Health Management and Health Economics)

  • Ma , Ching-To Albert

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Boston University)

Abstract

We model physicians as health care professionals who care about their services and monetary rewards. These preferences are heterogeneous. Different physicians trade off the monetary and service motives differently, and therefore respond differently to incentive schemes. Our model is set up for the Norwegian health care system. First, each private practice physician has a patient list, which may have more or less patients than he desires. The physician is paid a fee-for-service reimbursement and a capitation per listed patient. Second, a municipality may obligate the physician to perform 7.5 hours per week of community services. Our data are on an unbalanced panel of 435 physicians, with 412 physicians for the year 2002, and 400 for 2004. A physician’s amount of gross wealth and gross debt in previous periods are used as proxy for preferences for community service. First, for the current period, accumulated wealth and debt are predetermined. Second, wealth and debt capture lifestyle preferences because they correlate with the planned future income and spending. The main results show that both gross debt and gross wealth have negative effects on physicians’ supply of community health services. Gross debt and wealth have no effect on fee-for-service income per listed person in the physician’s practice, and positive effects on the total income from fee-for-service; hence, the higher income from fee-for-service is due to a longer patient list. Patient shortage has no significant effect on physicians’ supply of community services, a positive effect on the fee-for-service income per listed person, and no effect on the total income from fee-for service. These results confirm physician preference heterogeneity.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme in its series HERO On line Working Paper Series with number 2007:4.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 03 Jun 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:oslohe:2007_004

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Postal: HERO / Institute of Health Management and Health Economics P.O. Box 1089 Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway
Phone: 2307 5309
Fax: 2307 5310
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Web page: http://www.hero.uio.no/eng.html
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Keywords: physicians; incentive schemes; patient list; fee-for-service reimbursement; capitation per listed patient;

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References

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  1. Marc Fox, 2003. "Medical student indebtedness and the propensity to enter academic medicine," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 101-112.
  2. Yip, Winnie C., 1998. "Physician response to Medicare fee reductions: changes in the volume of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgeries in the Medicare and private sectors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 675-699, December.
  3. James Thornton, 2000. "Physician choice of medical specialty: do economic incentives matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(11), pages 1419-1428.
  4. Iversen, Tor, 2009. "A study of income-motivated behavior among general practitioners in the Norwegian list patient system," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2005:8, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
  5. Culler, Steven D. & Bazzoli, Gloria J., 1985. "The moonlighting decisions of resident physicians," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 283-292, September.
  6. John List & Matti Liski, 2005. "Introduction," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 31(2), pages 121-121, 06.
  7. Bazzoli, Gloria J., 1985. "Does educational indebtedness affect physician specialty choice?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, March.
  8. Godager, Geir & Lurås, Hilde, 2009. "I skyggen av Fastlegeordningen: Hvordan har det gått med det offentlige legearbeidet?," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2005:6, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
  9. Geir Godager & Hilde Lurås, 2009. "Dual job holding general practitioners: the effect of patient shortage," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(10), pages 1133-1145.
  10. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2005. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521848053.
  11. Moffitt, Robert A., 1999. "New developments in econometric methods for labor market analysis," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 24, pages 1367-1397 Elsevier.
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Cited by:
  1. Ching-to Albert MA & Tor Iversen, 2010. "Market conditions and general practitioners’ referrals," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2010-023, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  2. Kann, Inger Cathrine & Biørn, Erik & Lurås, Hilde, 2010. "Competition in general practice: Prescriptions to the elderly in a list patient system," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 751-764, September.
  3. Andreassen Leif & Di Tommaso Maria Laura & Strom Steinar, 2012. "Do medical doctors respond to economic incentives?," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201206, University of Turin.
  4. G. Fiorentini & E. Iezzi & M. Lippi Bruni & C. Ugolini, 2009. "Incentives In Primary Care and Their Impact on Potentially Avoidable Hospital Admissions," Working Papers 660, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  5. Marie Allard & Izabela Jelovac & Pierre-Thomas Léger, 2014. "Payment mechanism and GP self-selection: capitation versus fee for service," International Journal of Health Care Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 143-160, June.

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