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Swedish evidence on the impact of cognitive and non-cognitive ability on earnings – an extended pre-market factor approach

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  • Zetterberg, Johnny

    ()
    (IFAU - Institute for Labour Market Policy Evaluation)

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    Abstract

    This paper investigates the impact on earnings of non-cognitive ability, measured in terms of individuals’ 'self-esteem' on earnings. Starting with the pre-market factor approach suggested by Neal & Johnson (1996) a main finding is that measures of relative self-esteem along with cognitive ability are positively correlated with earnings. The analysis also reveals that the returns to cognitive and non-cognitive ability vary over the earnings-distribution: the returns are larger at higher levels of earnings than at low levels. While qualitatively robust, the effects decrease in magnitude when an extended version of the pre-market factor model is used.

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    File URL: http://www.ifau.se/upload/pdf/se/2005/wp05-16.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy in its series Working Paper Series with number 2005:16.

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    Length: 42 pages
    Date of creation: 21 Jun 2005
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2005_016

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: IFAU, P O Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden
    Phone: (+46) 18 - 471 70 70
    Fax: (+46) 18 - 471 70 71
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    Web page: http://www.ifau.se/
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    Related research

    Keywords: Incentive-influencing preferences; cognitive ability; non-cognitive ability; relative and absolute self-esteem; earnings distribution;

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    References

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    1. Fredriksson, Peter & Öckert, Björn, 2006. "Is early learning really more productive? The effect of school starting age on school and labor market performance," Working Paper Series 2006:12, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett & Frank Levy, 1995. "The Growing Importance of Cognitive Skills in Wage Determination," NBER Working Papers 5076, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Connolly, Sara & Micklewright, John & Nickell, Stephen, 1992. "The Occupational Success of Young Men Who Left School at Sixteen," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(3), pages 460-79, July.
    4. McKinley L. Blackburn & David Neumark, 1991. "Omitted-Ability Bias and the Increase in the Return to Schooling," NBER Working Papers 3693, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Sendhil Mullainathan & Marianne Bertrand, 2001. "Do People Mean What They Say? Implications for Subjective Survey Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 67-72, May.
    6. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J & Masterov, Dimitriy V, 2005. "Labor Market Discrimination and Racial Differences in Premarket Factors," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(1), pages 1-39, April.
    7. James Heckman & Pedro Carneiro, 2003. "Human Capital Policy," NBER Working Papers 9495, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. repec:att:wimass:9502 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Herbert Gintis & Samuel Bowles & Melissa Osborne, 2001. "Incentive-Enhancing Preferences: Personality, Behavior, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 155-158, May.
    10. Cameron, Stephen V & Heckman, James J, 1993. "The Nonequivalence of High School Equivalents," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(1), pages 1-47, January.
    11. Moshe Buchinsky, 1998. "Recent Advances in Quantile Regression Models: A Practical Guideline for Empirical Research," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(1), pages 88-126.
    12. Roland Bénabou & Jean Tirole, 2002. "Self-Confidence And Personal Motivation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(3), pages 871-915, August.
    13. Melissa Osborne & Herbert Gintis & Samuel Bowles, 2001. "The Determinants of Earnings: A Behavioral Approach," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1137-1176, December.
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