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Intimate Partner Violence and HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Author Info

  • Durevall, Dick

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Lindskog, Annika

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

We investigate the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV among married women using Demographic and Health Survey data from ten sub-Saharan African countries, and find a strong association. The association is due to higher HIV risk among violent men; neither women’s decreased ability to protect themselves from HIV transmission within marriage, nor their risky sexual behavior, explains the link. Thus, it is not violence per se that drives the spread of HIV, but the fact that violent men are more likely to become HIV positive and then infect their wives. Programs that aim at reducing HIV by eliminating IPV should therefore also focus on men’s risky sexual behavior.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/32623
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 563.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 27 Mar 2013
Date of revision: 14 May 2013
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0563

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Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/
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Related research

Keywords: AIDS; Domestic violence; HIV; Intimate partner violence; Gender inequality; Sub-Saharan Africa;

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References

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  1. Larry Sawers & Eileen Stillwaggon & Tom Hertz, 2008. "Cofactor Infections and HIV Epidemics in Developing Countries: Implications for Treatment," Working Papers 2008-03, American University, Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. David Fielding, 2013. "How Much Does Women's Empowerment Influence their Wellbeing? Evidence from Africa," Working Papers 1307, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2013.

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