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Organic Farming Technologies and Agricultural Productivity: The case of Semi-Arid Ethiopia

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Author Info

  • Kassie, Menale

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Zikhali, Precious

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

  • Pender, John

    ()
    (International Food Policy Research Institute, (IFPRI))

  • Köhlin, Gunnar

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

Organic farming practices, in as far as they rely on local or farm renewable resources, present desirable options for enhancing agricultural productivity for resource-constrained farmers in developing countries. In this paper we use plot-level data from semi-arid area of Ethiopia to investigate the impact of organic farming practices on crop productivity, with a particular focus on conservation tillage. Specifically we seek to investigate whether conservation tillage results in more or less productivity gains than chemical fertilizer. Our results reveal a clear superiority of organic farming practices over chemical fertilizers in enhancing crop productivity. Thus our results underscore the importance of encouraging resource-constrained farmers in developing countries to adopt organic farming practices, especially since they enable farmers to reduce production costs, provide environmental benefits, and as our results confirm, enhance crop productivity.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/18888
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 334.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: 16 Dec 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0334

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Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/
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Keywords: Conservation tillage; Chemical fertilizer; Crop productivity; Matched observations; Ethiopia;

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References

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  1. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2000. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," NBER Working Papers 7819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Grepperud, Sverre, 1996. "Population Pressure and Land Degradation: The Case of Ethiopia," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 18-33, January.
  3. Pender, John L. & Kerr, John M., 1998. "Determinants of farmers' indigenous soil and water conservation investments in semi-arid India," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 113-125, September.
  4. Kassie, Menale & Yesuf, Mahmud & Köhlin, Gunnar, 2008. "The Role of Production Risk in Sustainable Land-Management Technology Adoption in the Ethiopian Highlands," Discussion Papers dp-08-15-efd, Resources For the Future.
  5. Menale Kassie & John Pender & Mahmud Yesuf & Gunnar Kohlin & Randy Bluffstone & Elias Mulugeta, 2008. "Estimating returns to soil conservation adoption in the northern Ethiopian highlands," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(2), pages 213-232, 03.
  6. Honlonkou, Albert N., 2004. "Modelling adoption of natural resources management technologies: the case of fallow systems," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(03), pages 289-314, July.
  7. David R. Lee, 2005. "Agricultural Sustainability and Technology Adoption: Issues and Policies for Developing Countries," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1325-1334.
  8. Shiferaw, Bekele & Holden, Stein T., 1998. "Resource degradation and adoption of land conservation technologies 1n the Ethiopian Highlands: A case study in Andit Tid, North Shewa," Agricultural Economics: The Journal of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 18(3), May.
  9. James Levinsohn & Amil Petrin, 2003. "Estimating Production Functions Using Inputs to Control for Unobservables," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 70(2), pages 317-341.
  10. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
  11. Byerlee, Derek & Spielman, David J. & Alemu, Dawit & Gautam, Madhur, 2007. "Policies to promote cereal intensification in Ethiopia: A review of evidence and experience," IFPRI discussion papers 707, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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Cited by:
  1. Leonardo Becchetti & Pierluigi Conzo & Giuseppina Gianfreda, 2009. "Market access, organic farming and productivity: the determinants of creation of economic value on a sample of Fair Trade affiliated Thai farmers," Econometica Working Papers wp05, Econometica.
  2. Linda Kleemann & Awudu Abdulai & Mareike Buss, 2013. "Is Organic Farming Worth its Investment? The Adoption and Impact of Certified Pineapple Farming in Ghana," Kiel Working Papers 1856, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

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