Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Can Aid Generate Growth in Africa?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Bigsten, Arne

    (Department of Economics, School of Economics and Commercial Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

The paper discusses the impact of foreign aid on economic growth in Africa. After brief discussion about growth determinants it goes on to review the available evidence about the impact of aid on African economic growth. Evidence from both cross-country regressions and country studies is considered, and issues relating to economic policy, governance, ownership, and sustainability are identified as particularly important. Given those insights, some general conclusions are drawn as to what type of aid should be given. However, the main focus is on a discussion about how to structure the aid relationship so that it encourages good governance, which is deemed essential for long-term growth. Donors should delegate more responsibility to the recipients, while at the same time creating an incentive structure for good performance. This would include among other things a shift towards ex post conditionality and aid allocation according to performance. Given the improvements in the economic policy environment in Africa, the prospects for effective aid look more promising than they have for a long time.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://swopec.hhs.se/gunwpe/papers/gunwpe0003.pdf.zip
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://swopec.hhs.se/gunwpe/papers/gunwpe0003.pdf
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://swopec.hhs.se/gunwpe/papers/gunwpe0003.ps.zip
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://swopec.hhs.se/gunwpe/papers/gunwpe0003.ps
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 3.

as in new window
Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 15 May 1998
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Foreign Aid: New Perspectives, Gupta, Kanhaya L. (eds.), 1999, chapter Can Aid Generate Economic Growth in Africa?, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0003

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Aid; Growth; Africa;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Boone, Peter, 1996. "Politics and the effectiveness of foreign aid," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 289-329, February.
  2. Christopher Adam & Stephen A. O`Connell, 1997. "Aid, taxation and development: analytical perspectives on aid effectiveness in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1997-05, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Easterly, W & Levine, R, 1996. "Africa's Growth Tragedy : Policies and Ethnic Divisions," Papers 536, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  4. Mosley, Paul & Hudson, John & Horrell, Sara, 1987. "Aid, the Public Sector and the Market in Less Developed Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(387), pages 616-41, September.
  5. Claessens, Stijn & Naude, David, 1993. "Recent estimates of capital flight," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1186, The World Bank.
  6. repec:fth:oxesaf:97-2.1 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Burnside, Craig & Dollar, David, 1997. "Aid, policies, and growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1777, The World Bank.
  8. Bigsten, Arne & Moene, Karl Ove, 1996. "Growth and Rent Dissipation: The Case of Kenya," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 5(2), pages 177-98, June.
  9. Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1998. "Explaining African economic performance," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1997-02.2, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  10. Christopher S. Adam & Stephen O'Connell, 1997. "Aid, taxation and development: analytical perspectives on aid effectiveness in sub-Saharan Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 1997-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0003. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marie Andersson).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.