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What You Do, Not Who You Work For – a comparison of the occupational industry structures of the United States, Canada and Sweden

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Author Info

  • King, Karen

    (Martin Prosperity Institute)

  • Mellander, Charlotta

    ()
    (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)

  • Stolarick, Kevin

    (Martin Prosperity Institute)

Abstract

While there has been increased interest in the role of occupations, little has been done from a methodological and empirical approach to find out exactly how occupational analysis plays out on the ground in real places and how the study of the relationships among occupations across industries can further illuminate national and regional economic performance. This descriptive research enhances the understanding of the relationships among industries and occupations. These relationships are analyzed and compared at both national (United States, Canada, Sweden) and sample regional (Boston, Toronto, Stockholm) levels. We uncovered significant differences in occupation mix between North American and Swedish industries. While the United States and Canada rely more heavily on service class occupations, which typically pay much lower wages, Sweden has transformed its reliance on low-wage service workers by increasing its creative employment across the entire economy (knowledge, service, and goods producing industry sectors). However, this transition has resulted in a much smaller knowledge industry than is found in both the United States and Canada, which could mean that Sweden has optimized for the short-term but with long-term consequences.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies in its series Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation with number 221.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 11 Feb 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0221

Contact details of provider:
Postal: CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46 8 790 95 63
Web page: http://www.infra.kth.se/cesis/
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Keywords: Occupations; Industries; Education; Industrial Structure;

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  1. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  2. Meric S. Gertler, 2003. "Tacit knowledge and the economic geography of context, or The undefinable tacitness of being (there)," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(1), pages 75-99, January.
  3. Edward L. Glaeser & Albert Saiz, 2003. "The rise of the skilled city," Working Papers 04-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  4. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  5. Paul Romer, 1991. "Endogenous Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 3210, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Paul M. Romer, 1994. "The Origins of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 3-22, Winter.
  7. Allen J. Scott, 1997. "The Cultural Economy of Cities," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 323-339, 06.
  8. Per Lundequist & Dominic Power, 2002. "Putting Porter into Practice? Practices of Regional Cluster Building: Evidence from Sweden," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(6), pages 685-704, September.
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