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Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality: New evidence from a panel data analysis for sixteen European countries

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Author Info

  • Bentzen, Jan

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

  • Smith, Valdemar

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business)

Abstract

Empirical evidence gives strong support to a close association between liver cirrhosis mortality and the intake of alcohol and most often a log-linear relationship is assumed in the econometric modeling. The present analysis investigates for unit roots in a panel data set for sixteen European countries – covering the period 1970-2006 - where both alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis seem best described as trend-stationary variables. Therefore a fixed effects model including individual trends is applied in the analysis but also a more flexible non-linear functional form with fewer restrictions on the relationship between liver cirrhosis mortality and alcohol consumption is included. The conclusion is that the total level of alcohol consumption as well as the specific beverages – beer, wine and spirits – contributes to liver cirrhosis mortality, but the present study also reveals that directly addressing the question of panel unit roots and in this case subsequently applying a trend-stationary modeling methodology reduces the estimates of the impacts from alcohol consumption to liver cirrhosis. Finally, more restrictive alcohol policies seem to have positively influenced the country-specific development in cirrhosis mortality.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 10-9.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 01 Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:aareco:2010_009

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Postal: The Aarhus School of Business, Prismet, Silkeborgvej 2, DK 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Phone: +45 89 486396
Fax: +45 8615 5175
Web page: http://www.asb.dk/departments/nat.aspx
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Related research

Keywords: Alcohol consumption; Liver cirrhosis mortality; Trend-stationary panel data; Non-linear modelling;

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Cited by:
  1. Jon P. Nelson, 2013. "Does Heavy Drinking by Adults Respond to Higher Alcohol Prices and Taxes? A Survey and Assessment," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 43(3), pages 265-291, December.

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