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A Tale of Two Stadiums: Comparing the Economic Impact of Chicago’s Wrigley Field and U.S. Cellular Field

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Author Info

  • Victor Matheson

    ()
    (Department of Economics, College of the Holy Cross)

  • Robert Baade

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Business, Lake Forest College)

  • Mimi Nikolova

    (Department of Economics and Business, Lake Forest College)

Abstract

Supporters of sports stadium construction often defend taxpayer subsidies for stadiums by suggesting that sports infrastructure can serve as an anchor for local economic redevelopment. Have such promises of economic rejuvenation been realized? The City of Chicago provides an interesting case study on how a new stadium, U. S. Cellular Field, has been integrated into its southside neighborhood in a way that may well have limited local economic activity. This economic outcome stands in stark contrast to Wrigley Field in northern Chicago which continues to experience a synergistic commercial relationship with its neighborhood.

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File URL: http://college.holycross.edu/RePEc/hcx/Matheson_TwoStadiums.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0608.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Geographische Rundschau International Edition, Vol. 3:1, January 2007, pp. 53-58.
Handle: RePEc:hcx:wpaper:0608

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Keywords: sports; sports; stadiums; development; baseball; Chicago; economic impact;

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  1. John J. Siegfried & Andrew Zimbalist, 2000. "The Economics of Sports Facilities and Their Communities," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 95-114, Summer.
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Cited by:
  1. Victor Matheson, 2012. "Assessing the infrastructure impact of mega-events in emerging economies," Working Papers 1203, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.

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