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Non-employment, Ill-being and Subjective Well-being

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  • Zsuzsa Kapitany

    ()
    (Institute of Economics - Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

Recent happiness studies by economists, sociologist and psychologists have produced many important new approaches and attitudes to focus less on objective variables and more on subjective well-being (SWB). Studies investigating life satisfaction (as a proxy of SWB) have identified strong relations with income, labour market status and health state. In this literature review we try to be acquainted with and analyse the dynamic effect of income, health state (ill-being) and labour market status (non-employment) on SWB. Studies collected together have numbers of evidence suggesting that money (own and others') really does matter, and subjective health state (ill-being) and non-employment status are strongly and negatively associated with SWB. The connection between SWB and health, SWB and employment, as well as health and employment has been widely investigated in the literature. However, the dynamics of poor health and non-employment, and their interrelation with SWB were rarely analysed. The review also deals with a range of methodological problems and contradictory evidence concerning the direction of causality between the investigated variables. Our research motivation is quite clear as Hungary is "unique" among the developed market economies and the transition countries with respect to some features: Hungary has almost the lowest employment rate, the highest involuntary early retirement share, the highest mortality rate, and almost the lowest SWB score.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences in its series IEHAS Discussion Papers with number 0922.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:has:discpr:0922

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Keywords: Subjective Well-being; Relative Income; Non-employment; Ill-being; Dynamic Panel Models;

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  1. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
  2. Bernard M.S. van Praag & P. Frijters & A. Ferrer-i-Carbonell, 2002. "The Anatomy of Subjective Well-being," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 02-022/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  3. Axel Börsch-Supan & Hendrik Jürges, 2009. "Early Retirement, Social Security and Well-Being in Germany," NBER Chapters, in: Developments in the Economics of Aging, pages 173-199 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Di Tella, Rafael & Haisken-De New, John & MacCulloch, Robert, 2010. "Happiness adaptation to income and to status in an individual panel," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 834-852, December.
  5. Petri Böckerman & Pekka Ilmakunnas, 2009. "Unemployment and self-assessed health: evidence from panel data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 161-179.
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