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The Roma/non-Roma Test Score Gap in Hungary

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Author Info

  • Gabor Kertesi

    ()
    (Institute of Economics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

  • Gabor Kezdi

    ()
    (Central European University, Institute of Economics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

Abstract

This paper documents and decomposes the test score gap between Roma and non-Roma 8th graders in Hungary in 2006. Our data connect national standardized test scores to an individual panel survey with detailed data on ethnicity and family background. The test score gap is approximately one standard deviation for both reading and mathematics, which is similar to the gap between African-American and White students of the same age group in the U.S. in the 1980s. After accounting for on health, parenting, school fixed effects and family background, the gap disappears in reading and drops to 0.15 standard deviation in mathematics. Health, parenting and schools explain most of the gap, but ethnic differences in those are almost entirely accounted for by differences in parental education and income.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences in its series Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market with number 1010.

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Date of creation: Dec 2010
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Handle: RePEc:has:bworkp:1010

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Keywords: test score gap; Roma minority; Hungary;

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References

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  1. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1308-1334, December.
  2. Anne Case & Christina Paxson, 2008. "Stature and Status: Height, Ability, and Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(3), pages 499-532, 06.
  3. Roland G. Fryer & Steven D. Levitt, 2006. "The Black-White Test Score Gap Through Third Grade," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 249-281.
  4. Jere R. Behrman & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2004. "Returns to Birthweight," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 586-601, May.
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Cited by:
  1. O'Higgins, Niall & Brüggemann, Christian, 2013. "The Consequences of Cumulative Discrimination: How Special Schooling Influences Employment and Wages of Roma in the Czech Republic," IZA Discussion Papers 7668, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Gabor Kertesi & Gabor Kezdi, 2012. "Ethnic segregation between Hungarian schools: Long-run trends and geographic distribution," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1208, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  3. Stacy J. Kosko, 2012. "Educational Attainment and School-to-work Conversion of Roma in Romania: Adapting to Feasible Means or Ends?," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 415-450, August.
  4. Kertesi, Gábor & Kézdi, Gábor, 2012. "A roma és nem roma tanulók teszteredményei közti különbségekről és e különbségek okairól
    [The Roma/non-Roma test-score gap in Hungarian education]
    ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(7), pages 798-853.
  5. Gabor Kertesi & Gabor Kezdi, 2013. "School segregation, school choice and educational policies in 100 Hungarian towns," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1312, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

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