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Technical progress in North and welfare gains in South under nonhomothetic preferences

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  • Lilas Demmou

    (PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - CNRS : UMR8545 - École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) - École des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC) - École normale supérieure [ENS] - Paris, EEP-PSE - Ecole d'Économie de Paris - Paris School of Economics - Ecole d'Économie de Paris)

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    Abstract

    The paper proposes a theoretical model investigating the welfare consequences of technological shocks in a Ricardian framework (a la Dornbush, Fisher and Samuelson, 1977). Contrary to existing literature, the model incorporates a nonhomothetic demand function whose price and income elasticities are endogenously determined by technology. The model is applied to the case of trade between two economies with different development levels. It is shown in particular that the developing country can experience a fall in utility as a result of technical progress in the developed country. This result depends on the type of technological shock assumed (biased vs uniform technical progress), as well as on the size of the development gap.

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    File URL: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/58/83/10/PDF/wp200708.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by HAL in its series Working Papers with number halshs-00588310.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2007
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    Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00588310

    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00588310
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    Related research

    Keywords: Dornbush-Fisher-Samuelson Ricardian model ; technology and trade ; North-South trade ; nonhomothetic preferences ; hierarchic needs ; hierarchic purchases;

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    1. Peter K. Schott, 2004. "Across-product Versus Within-product Specialization in International Trade," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(2), pages 646-677, May.
    2. Anthony Philip Thirlwall, 1979. "The Balance of Payments Constraint as an Explanation of International Growth Rate Differences," Banca Nazionale del Lavoro Quarterly Review, Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, vol. 32(128), pages 45-53.
    3. Reto Foellmi & Josef Zweimüller, . "Income Distribution and Demand-induced Innovations," IEW - Working Papers 212, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Tamim Bayoumi, 1999. "Estimating Trade Equations from Aggregate Bilateral Data," IMF Working Papers 99/74, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Kaldor, Nicholas, 1970. "The Case for Regional Policies," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 17(3), pages 337-48, November.
    6. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2000. "A Ricardian Model with a Continuum of Goods under Nonhomothetic Preferences: Demand Complementarities, Income Distribution, and North-South Trade," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1093-1120, December.
    7. Hallak, Juan Carlos, 2006. "Product quality and the direction of trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 238-265, January.
    8. Puga, Diego & Venables, Anthony J, 1999. "Agglomeration and Economic Development: Import Substitution vs. Trade Liberalisation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(455), pages 292-311, April.
    9. Houthakker, Hendrik S & Magee, Stephen P, 1969. "Income and Price Elasticities in World Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(2), pages 111-25, May.
    10. Jonathan Perraton, 2003. "Balance of Payments Constrained Growth and Developing Countries: An examination of Thirlwall's hypothesis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 1-22.
    11. Carmen Fillat & Joseph Francois, 2004. "National and International Income Dispersion and Aggregate Expenditures," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-093/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    12. Devashish Mitra & Vitor Trindade, 2005. "Inequality and trade," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(4), pages 1253-1271, November.
    13. Muscatelli, Vito Antonio & Stevenson, Andrew A & Montagna, Catia, 1995. "Modeling Aggregate Manufactured Exports for Some Asian Newly Industrialized Economies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 147-55, February.
    14. Meliciani, Valentina, 2002. "The impact of technological specialisation on national performance in a balance-of-payments-constrained growth model," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 101-118, March.
    15. Jackson, Laurence Fraser, 1984. "Hierarchic Demand and the Engel Curve for Variety," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 8-15, February.
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