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Malaria, Production and Income of the Producers of Coffee and Cocoa: an Analysis from Survey Data in Côte d'Ivoire. Malaria, coffee and cocoa production and income

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  • Martine Audibert

    (CERDI - Centre d'études et de recherches sur le developpement international - CNRS : UMR6587 - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I)

  • Jean-François Brun

    (CERDI - Centre d'études et de recherches sur le developpement international - CNRS : UMR6587 - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I)

  • Jacky Mathonnat

    (CERDI - Centre d'études et de recherches sur le developpement international - CNRS : UMR6587 - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I)

  • M.-C. Henry

    (CREC - CREC - CREC)

Abstract

The sectors of coffee and cocoa represented in Côte d'Ivoire, before the political crisis, approximately 15% of the GDP and 40% of exports. The zones of production of these two cultures are in the forest area which is infected with malaria. The culture of these products is less constraining than that of the food crops such as rice or yam (one does not need to replant each year for example). However, the maintenance of the ground and of the trees and pest management contribute to obtain high yields. In addition, these products allow the producers to obtain monetary income. However, output is not the sole determinant of the level of income: precocity and speed of gathering, by permitting early sale, contribute to get higher income. In addition, food crops such as rice growing, are produced in the area. The objective of this paper is twofold, first, to evaluate the role of malaria on coffee and cocoa productions, second, to assess if the behaviour of rural households facing a liberalisation of the coffee and cocoa chains has an impact on their income. Three functions are thus estimated: production of coffee, production of cocoa and income. Data are taken from a survey carried out on 800 households (21 villages) in 1999 in the forest area of Danané. The main results are the absence of malaria impact on productions and the dominance of individual over collective sale strategies.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HAL in its series Working Papers with number halshs-00557214.

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Date of creation: 18 Jan 2011
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Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00557214

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Keywords: cocoa; coffee; lowland rice; malaria; sharecropping; Côte d'Ivoire;

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  1. Schultz, T-P, 1996. "Wage and Labor Supply effects of Illness in Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana : Instrumental Variable Estimates for Days Disabled," Papers, Yale - Economic Growth Center 757, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  2. Audibert, Martine & Mathonnat, Jacky & Henry, Marie-Claire, 2003. "Social and health determinants of the efficiency of cotton farmers in Northern Côte d'Ivoire," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 1705-1717, April.
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  6. Samuel Benin & Mohamed Ahmed & John Pender & Simeon Ehui, 2005. "Development of Land Rental Markets and Agricultural Productivity Growth: The Case of Northern Ethiopia," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(1), pages 21-54, March.
  7. Mochebelele, Motsamai T. & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2000. "Migrant Labor and Farm Technical Efficiency in Lesotho," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 143-153, January.
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  10. Audibert, Martine & Etard, Jean-Francois, 2003. "Productive Benefits after Investment in Health in Mali," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(3), pages 769-82, April.
  11. Coelli, Tim & Fleming, Euan, 2004. "Diversification economies and specialisation efficiencies in a mixed food and coffee smallholder farming system in Papua New Guinea," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, Blackwell, vol. 31(2-3), pages 229-239, December.
  12. Asfaw, Abay & von Braun, Joachim, 2004. "Is Consumption Insured against Illness? Evidence on Vulnerability of Households to Health Shocks in Rural Ethiopia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 115-29, October.
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