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Overrepresentation of women in public and nonprofit sector jobs: Evidence from a French national survey

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  • Joseph Lanfranchi

    (LEM - Laboratoire d'Économie Moderne - Université Paris II - Panthéon-Assas : EA4442, CEE - Centre d'études de l'emploi - Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur et Recherche - Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé)

  • Mathieu Narcy

    (CEE - Centre d'études de l'emploi - Ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur et Recherche - Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé, TEPP - Travail, Emploi et Politiques Publiques - CNRS : FR3435 - Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée (UPEMLV), ERUDITE - Equipe de Recherche sur l'Utilisation des Données Individuelles Temporelles en Economie - Université Paris-Est Créteil Val-de-Marne (UPEC) : EA437 - Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée (UPEMLV))

Abstract

Women are overrepresented in the public and nonprofit sectors. This article aims to bring to light the reasons behind this phenomenon. The originality of the employer-employee matched data used allows us to consider a large scope of potential reasons. Using a non-linear decomposition technique (Fairlie, 2005), we find that in addition to the well-known occupational segregation effect, the overrepresentation of women in the public and nonprofit sectors is associated with two common factors: greater offerings of family-friendly practices and higher attraction of men for certain fringe benefits that are more frequently provided by the for-profit sector. Sector-specific factors also exist. The higher wage advantage obtained by women compared with men working in the public sector rather than in the for-profit sector contributes to the feminization of the public sector. Similarly, the overrepresentation of women in the nonprofit sector is linked to greater access to part-time jobs and shorter workweeks there.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00872954.

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Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published, Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 2013, 28 p
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00872954

Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00872954
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Web page: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/

Related research

Keywords: Public and nonprofit sectors; overrepresentation of women; occupational segregation; family-friendly policies;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

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  1. Lanfranchi J. & Narcy M., 2006. "Wages and effort in the French for-profit and nonprofit sectors: Labor Donation Theory Revisited," Working Papers ERMES 0620, ERMES, University Paris 2.
  2. Helena Skyt Nielsen & Marianne Simonsen & Mette Verner, . "Does the Gap in Family-Friendly Policies Drive the Family Gap?," Economics Working Papers 2003-1, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
  3. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
  4. Gregg, Paul & Grout, Paul A. & Ratcliffe, Anita & Smith, Sarah & Windmeijer, Frank, 2011. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 758-766, August.
  5. Michele Mosca & Marco Musella & Francesco Pastore, 2007. "Relational Goods, Monitoring And Non-Pecuniary Compensations In The Nonprofit Sector: The Case Of The Italian Social Services," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 78(1), pages 57-86, 03.
  6. Joseph Lanfranchi & Mathieu Narcy & Makram Larguem, 2010. "Shedding new light on intrinsic motivation to work: evidence from a discrete choice experiment," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 75-93, 02.
  7. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-74, June.
  8. Jean-Michel ETIENNE & Mathieu NARCY, 2010. "Gender Wage Differentials in the French Nonprofit and For-Profit Sectors: Evidence from Quantile Regression," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 99-100, pages 67-90.
  9. Dominique Meurs & Sophie Ponthieux, 2006. "L'écart des salaires entre les femmes et les hommes peut-il encore baisser ?," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 398(1), pages 99-129.
  10. Leete, Laura, 2000. "Wage equity and employee motivation in nonprofit and for-profit organizations," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 423-446, December.
  11. Catherine Eckel & Philip Grossman, 2008. "Subsidizing charitable contributions: a natural field experiment comparing matching and rebate subsidies," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 234-252, September.
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