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Technical Progress in Transport and the Tourism Area Life Cycle

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  • Andrew Kato

    ()
    (University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa)

  • James Mak

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization)

Abstract

Richard ButlerÕs tourism area life cycle envisions tourism destinations to evolve in stages from exploration to rapid growth followed by slackening, stagnation, and even decline. The eventual slow-down in tourism growth is attributed to the destinations reaching their physical and social carrying capacities. This article examines the evolution of Hawaii as a tourism destination from 1922 to 2009. We demonstrate that tourism growth in Hawaii has declined but not because the destination has reached its carrying capacity but primarily because of the slowdown in technical progress in passenger air transportation and competition from newer destinations. We conclude that for destinations that depend on transportation improvements to attract tourists, technical progress in transport may provide a better explanation of the evolution of their destinations than their carrying capacities.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa in its series Working Papers with number 2010-13.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hae:wpaper:2010-13

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Related research

Keywords: Tourism Area Life Cycle; Transportation; Technical Progress;

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  1. Carl Bonham & Christopher Edmonds & James Mak, 2006. "The Impact of 9/11 and Other Terrible Global Events on Tourism in the U.S. and Hawaii," Working Papers 200602, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
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