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Education and Freedom of Choice: Evidence from Arranged Marriages in Vietnam

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  • Stephen C. Smith

    ()

  • M. Shahe Emran

    ()
    (Department of Economics/Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

  • Fenohasina Maret

    ()
    (Department of Economics, George Washington University)

Abstract

Using household data from Vietnam, we provide evidence on the causal effects of education on freedom of spouse choice. We use war disruptions and spatial indicators of schooling supply as instruments. The point estimates indicate that a year of additional schooling reduces the probability of an arranged marriage by about 14 percentage points for an individual with 8 years of schooling. We also estimate bounds that do not rely on the exact exclusion restrictions (lower bound is 6-7 percentage points). The impact of education is strong for women, but much weaker for men.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy in its series Working Papers with number 2009-15.

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Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2009-15

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Web page: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/
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Keywords: Arranged Marriage; Education; Schooling; Freedom of choice; Development; Vietnam; Social Interactions;

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References

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. The Relationship Between Education and Arranged Marriages
    by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-10-07 11:00:49
  2. Utbildning och tvångsäktenskap
    by Niclas Berggren in Nonicoclolasos on 2010-10-12 11:30:25

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