Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Rural Reforms, Agricultural Productivity, and the Biological Standard of Living in South Korea, 1941-1974

Contents:

Author Info

  • Robert Rudolf

    (Georg-August-University Göttingen)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper analyzes effects of the Republic of Korea’s two major rural reforms in 1950 and 1962/63 on agricultural productivity and individual well-being. The 1950 Land Reform resulted in a large-scale redistribution of land while ‘green revolution’-type reforms in 1962/63 pushed forward the application of modern agricultural technologies and improved rural infrastructure. This study’s findings indicate that both reforms had significant positive impacts on agricultural productivity. Using the link between final height outcomes and early childhood nutrition further allows an assessment of the effects of the interventions on the biological standard of living using adult height outcomes. Korean mean adult height grew by a remarkable 8.1 to 12 cm for women and 7 to 9.6 cm for men born between 1920 and 1987. Two thirds of this growth took place after the 1950 reform, and about 40 to 50 percent after the 1962/63 reforms. Structural break analyses of height trends reveal significant upward shifts in trend around the years of the reforms. While Korea can be considered a case of successful land reform, the years between the two major reforms can be considered Korea’s lost decade.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www2.vwl.wiso.uni-goettingen.de/courant-papers/CRC-PEG_DP_106.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Courant Research Centre PEG in its series Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers with number 106.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 10 Jan 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:got:gotcrc:106

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Platz der Goettinger Sieben 3; D-37073 Goettingen, GERMANY
    Phone: +49 551 39 14066
    Fax: + 49 551 39 14059
    Web page: http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/82144.html

    Related research

    Keywords: Land Reform; Rural Technological Reforms; Agricultural Productivity; Biological Standard of Living; Equity-Efficiency;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Steckel, Richard H., 2009. "Heights and human welfare: Recent developments and new directions," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-23, January.
    2. Kopczynski, Michal, 2007. "Agrarian reforms, agrarian crisis and the biological standard of living in Poland, 1844-1892," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 458-470, December.
    3. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 1994. "Is Inequality Harmful for Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 600-621, June.
    4. Alesina, Alberto & Rodrik, Dani, 1994. "Distributive Politics and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 465-90, May.
    5. repec:bla:restud:v:76:y:2009:i:1:p:143-179 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Choi, Seong-Jin & Schwekendiek, Daniel, 2009. "The biological standard of living in colonial Korea, 1910-1945," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 259-264, July.
    7. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Why Have Some Indian States Done Better Than Others at Reducing Rural Poverty?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(257), pages 17-38, February.
    8. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer & Vollrath, Dietrich, 2008. "Inequality in Land Ownership, the Emergence of Human Capital Promoting Institutions and the Great Divergence," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 6751, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Richard H. Steckel, 1995. "Stature and the Standard of Living," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1903-1940, December.
    10. Angus Deaton, 2008. "Height, health, and inequality: the distribution of adult heights in India," Working Papers, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies. 1009, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    11. Otsuka, Keijiro & Chuma, Hiroyuki & Hayami, Yujiro, 1992. "Land and Labor Contracts in Agrarian Economies: Theories and Facts," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 1965-2018, December.
    12. Kimura, Mitsuhiko, 1993. "Standards of Living in Colonial Korea: Did the Masses Become Worse Off or Better Off Under Japanese Rule?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(03), pages 629-652, September.
    13. Perron, P, 1988. "The Great Crash, The Oil Price Shock And The Unit Root Hypothesis," Papers, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program 338, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
    14. Feder, Gershon & Feeny, David, 1991. "Land Tenure and Property Rights: Theory and Implications for Development Policy," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 5(1), pages 135-53, January.
    15. Shenggen Fan & Connie Chan-Kang, 2005. "Is small beautiful? Farm size, productivity, and poverty in Asian agriculture," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(s1), pages 135-146, 01.
    16. John Komlos, . "The Secular Trend in the Biological Standard of Living in the United Kingdom, 1730-1860," Articles by John Komlos, Department of Economics, University of Munich 19, Department of Economics, University of Munich.
    17. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1998. "New ways of looking at old issues: inequality and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 259-287.
    18. Morgan, Stephen L., 2009. "Stature and economic development in South China, 1810-1880," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 53-69, January.
    19. A. de Janvry & E. Sadoulet, 2002. "World Poverty and the Role of Agricultural Technology: Direct and Indirect Effects," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 1-26.
    20. Minten, Bart & Barrett, Christopher B., 2008. "Agricultural Technology, Productivity, and Poverty in Madagascar," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 797-822, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:got:gotcrc:106. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dominik Noe).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.