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Valuing the Benefits of Coastal Water Quality Improvements using Contingent and Real Behaviour

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Author Info

  • Nick Hanley
  • Begona Alvarez-Farizo

Abstract

Recent moves in the European Union have been made towards a toughening of legislation on bathing water quality. This has focussed policy-makers thoughts on the welfare benefits resulting from such improvements, especially given their cost. Our paper uses a combined stated and revealed preference approach to value coastal water quality improvements, focussing on an area of Scotland which has consistently failed to meet standards under the Bathing Waters Directive. We combine data on real behaviour with data on contingent behaviour using a random effects negative binomial panel model. This allows us to predict both the change in participation (trips) should water quality be improved, and the welfare increase per trip. Our model includes allowance for the existence of substitute sites, and for changes in recreational behaviour during a beach visit.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow in its series Working Papers with number 2002_9.

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Date of creation:
Date of revision: Sep 2002
Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2002_9

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Phone: 0141 330 4618
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Web page: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/research/
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Related research

Keywords: bathing water quality; contingent behaviour; combined stated-revealed preference models; panel data; sewage pollution;

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  1. Englin, Jeffrey & Lambert, David & Shaw, W. Douglass, 1997. "A Structural Equations Approach to Modeling Consumptive Recreation Demand," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 33-43, May.
  2. Adamowicz, Wiktor & Swait, Joffre & Boxall, Peter & Louviere, Jordan & Williams, Michael, 1997. "Perceptions versus Objective Measures of Environmental Quality in Combined Revealed and Stated Preference Models of Environmental Valuation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 65-84, January.
  3. W. Douglass Shaw & Peter Feather, 1999. "Possibilities for Including the Opportunity Cost of Time in Recreation Demand Systems," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 75(4), pages 592-602.
  4. W. Douglass Shaw, 2002. "Testing the Validity of Contingent Behavior Trip Responses," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(2), pages 401-414.
  5. Jeffrey Englin & Trudy Cameron, 1996. "Augmenting travel cost models with contingent behavior data," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 7(2), pages 133-147, March.
  6. S Georgiou & I H Langford & I J Bateman & R K Turner, 1998. "Determinants of individuals' willingness to pay for perceived reductions in environmental health risks: a case study of bathing water quality," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 30(4), pages 577-594, April.
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