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Emerging Non-OECD Countries: Global Shifts in Power and Geopolitical Regionalization

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  • Anika Moroff

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    (GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies)

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    Abstract

    Since 1990 the banning of ethnic and other identity-based parties has become the norm in sub-Saharan Africa. This article focuses on Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda as three East African countries that have opted for different ways of dealing with such parties. Using case studies, it traces the origins of the party bans in Tanzania and Uganda and explores the reasons for the absence of a ban in Kenya. The analysis shows that the laws on particularistic parties have actually been implemented by the appropriate institutions. However,these laws have only marginally influenced the character of the political parties in the three countries: A comparison of regional voting patterns suggests that bans on particularistic parties have not ensured the emergence of aggregative parties with a national following in Tanzania and Uganda. In Kenya on the other hand, where such a ban was nonexistent until 2008, parties have not proven to be more regional.

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    File URL: http://repec.giga-hamburg.de/pdf/giga_10_wp129_moroff.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies in its series GIGA Working Paper Series with number 129.

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    Length: 35 pages
    Date of creation: Apr 2010
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:gig:wpaper:129

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    Related research

    Keywords: Sub-Saharan Africa; party ban; ethnic parties; Kenya; Tanzania; Uganda; party regulation; party nationalization;

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    1. Sebastian Elischer, 2008. "Ethnic Coalitions of Convenience and Commitment: Political Parties and Party Systems in Kenya," GIGA Working Paper Series 68, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    2. Alexander Stroh, 2009. "The Power of Proximity: Strategic Decisions in African Party Politics," GIGA Working Paper Series 96, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    3. Blum, Stefan, 2006. "East Africa: Cycles of Violence, and the Paradox of Peace," Discussion Papers 7118, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
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