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Women's Role in the Agricultural Household: Bargaining and Human Capital

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Author Info

  • Schultz, T.P.

Abstract

This paper reviews the methods and empirical findings from economic analyses of women's contribution to social welfare and the determinants of their human capital. To understand better women's roles in agricultural households, three themes have gained prominence in the economics literature. First is the conceptualization of the unified family as coordinator of production and consumption over the lifecycle. Second is the role of separability of production and consumption decisions in the agricultural household that depends on the equivalence of hired and of family labor and the existence of competitive factor markets. Third, is the exploration of individualistic Nash-bargaining or Pareto efficient collective coordination within the family that preserves the distinct preferences of individuals to be expressed in behavioral variation across families.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Yale - Economic Growth Center in its series Papers with number 803.

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Length: 94 pages
Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:yalegr:803

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Postal: U.S.A.; YALE UNIVERSITY, ECONOMIC GROWTH CENTER, YALE STATION NEW-HAVEN CONNECTICUT 06520 U.S.A
Phone: (203) 432-3610
Fax: (203) 432-3898
Web page: http://www.econ.yale.edu/~egcenter/
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Related research

Keywords: LABOUR MARKET ; HUMAN RESOURCES ; WOMEN ; SOCIAL WELFARE;

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Cited by:
  1. Adebayo B. Aromolaran, 2004. "Female Schooling, Non-Market Productivity, and Labor Market Participation in Nigeria," Working Papers 879, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  2. Findeis, Jill L., 2002. "Subjective Equilibrium Theory of the Farm Household: Theory Revisited and New Directions," Workshop on the Farm Household-Firm Unit: Its Importance in Agriculture and Implications for Statistics, April 12-13, 2002, Wye Campus,Imperial College 15723, International Agricultural Policy Reform and Adjustment Project (IAPRAP).
  3. Shareen Joshi, 2004. "Female Household-Headship in Rural Bangladesh: Incidence, Determinants and Impact on Children's Schooling Shareen Joshi," Working Papers 894, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  4. Schultz, T. Paul, 2006. "Does the Liberalization of Trade Advance Gender Equality in Schooling and Health?," IZA Discussion Papers 2140, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Nistha Sinha & Joanne Yoong, 2009. "Long-Term Financial Incentives and Investment in Daughters: Evidence From Conditional Cash Transfers In North India," Working Papers 667, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  6. Deininger, Klaus & Castagnini, Raffaella, 2006. "Incidence and impact of land conflict in Uganda," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 321-345, July.
  7. Chang, Yang-Ming & Huang, Biing-Wen & Chen, Yun-Ju, 2012. "Labor supply, income, and welfare of the farm household," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 427-437.

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