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International Trade And Investment Under Different Rates Of Time Preference

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  • FUKAO, K.
  • HAMADA, K.

Abstract

This paper attempts to integrate the theory of trade with that of capital movements, and to study the two country world where each nation has a different rate of time preference. It resolves the indeterminacy problem intrinsic in the Heckscher-Ohlin model where trade and factor movements coexist by assuming that capital movements are infinitesimally more costly than trade in goods. Under certain assumptions, one can dichotomize the behavior of asset accumulation from the dynamic pattern of trade specialization. Complete specialization will take place most likely in the country with a higher rate of time preference, which specializes into the more labor-intensive sector. It is shown that a single-commodity model does exaggerate the amount of capital movements, but that the qualitative nature of asset accumulation patterns obtained in a single-commodity model of capital movements holds intact in the model that incorporates trade. This paper offers another explanation to the Feldstein-Horioka paradox that domestic investment responds more closely to increasing savings than capital outflows do. If an economy is imperfectly specialized, increased savings will be absorbed in capital deepening rather than in capital outflow.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Yale - Economic Growth Center in its series Papers with number 605.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 1990
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:yalegr:605

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Postal: U.S.A.; YALE UNIVERSITY, ECONOMIC GROWTH CENTER, YALE STATION NEW-HAVEN CONNECTICUT 06520 U.S.A
Phone: (203) 432-3610
Fax: (203) 432-3898
Web page: http://www.econ.yale.edu/~egcenter/
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Keywords: international trade ; capital movements ; economic models;

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References

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  1. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1970. "Factor Price Equalization in a Dynamic Economy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 78(3), pages 456-88, May-June.
  2. Nouriel Roubini, 1988. "Current Account and Budget Deficits in an Intertemporal Model of Consumption and Taxation Smoothing. A Solution to the "Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle"?," NBER Working Papers 2773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Willem H. Buiter, 1979. "Time Preference and International Lending and Borrowing in an Overlapping-Generations Model," NBER Working Papers 0352, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Becker, Robert A, 1980. "On the Long-Run Steady State in a Simple Dynamic Model of Equilibrium with Heterogeneous Households," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 95(2), pages 375-82, September.
  5. Fischer, Stanley & Frenkel, Jacob A, 1974. "Interest Rate Equalization and Patterns of Production, Trade and Consumption in a Two-country Growth Model," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 50(132), pages 555-80, December.
  6. Ronald W. Jones, 1965. "The Structure of Simple General Equilibrium Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 557.
  7. Engel, Charles & Kletzer, Kenneth, 1989. "Saving and Investment in an Open Economy with Non-traded Goods," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(4), pages 735-52, November.
  8. Michael Dooley & Jeffrey Frankel & Donald J. Mathieson, 1987. "International Capital Mobility: What Do Saving-Investment Correlations Tell Us?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 34(3), pages 503-530, September.
  9. Kyoji Fukao & Koichi Hamada, 1989. "The Fisherian Time Preference and the Ebolution of Capital Ownership Patterns in a Global Economy," NBER Working Papers 3104, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Ruffin, Roy J, 1979. "Growth and the Long-Run Theory of International Capital Movements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(5), pages 832-42, December.
  11. Uekawa, Yasuo, 1972. "On the existence of incomplete specialization in international trade with capital mobility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 1-23, February.
  12. Martin Feldstein & Charles Horioka, 1979. "Domestic Savings and International Capital Flows," NBER Working Papers 0310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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