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Labor Market Performance As A Determinant Of Migration

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  • VIJVERBERG, W.P.M.

Abstract

Are migrants more productive workers than nonmigrants? Such a comparison concerns both observed and unobservable productivity factors. This paper focuses on the correlation between unobservable factors at places of origin and destination. A human capital model of migration demonstrates that more productive workers at the origin would migrate only if the correlation between origin and destination factors is strongly positive. Longitudinal data from the Ivory Cost suggest that, indeed, the more productive workers do migrate. Furthermore, people migrate generally towards cities. Therefore, rural areas lose their productive workers; urban areas may gain in productivity from the geographical shifts in population. Copyright 1993 by The London School of Economics and Political Science.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Bank - Living Standards Measurement in its series Papers with number 59.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 1989
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:wobali:59

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Related research

Keywords: workers ; productivity ; migrants ; rural areas ; urban areas ; human resources;

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Cited by:
  1. Kristensen, Nicolai & Verner, Dorte, 2005. "Labor market distortions in Cote d'Ivoire : analyses of employer-employee data from the manufacturing sector," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3771, The World Bank.
  2. Nkamleu, Guy Blaise & Fox, Louise, 2006. "Taking Stock of Research on Regional Migration in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 15112, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Consuelo Abellán-Colodrón, 1998. "Ganancia salarial esperada como determinante de la decisión individual de emigrar," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 22(1), pages 93-117, January.
  4. Mika Haapanen, 2001. "Labour market performance and determinants of migration by gender and region of origin," ERSA conference papers ersa01p130, European Regional Science Association.
  5. John Cameron, 1996. "The challenge of combining quantitative and qualitative methods in Labour Force and livelihoods analysis: A case-study of Bangladesh," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(5), pages 625-653.
  6. Agarwal, Reena & Horowitz, Andrew W., 2002. "Are International Remittances Altruism or Insurance? Evidence from Guyana Using Multiple-Migrant Households," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 2033-2044, November.
  7. Katarzyna Budnik, 2011. "Emigration Triggers: International Migration of Polish Workers between 1994 and 2009," National Bank of Poland Working Papers 90, National Bank of Poland, Economic Institute.

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