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Public and Private Roles in Health

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  • Musgrove, P.
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    Abstract

    The appropriate role of the state in health is complex both in economic theory and in practice. Theory identifies three reasons for state action: public goods or services with large externalities (involving efficiency); poverty (involving equity); and failings peculiar to insurance markets for health care (where both inefficiency and inequity arise). The insurance domain presents the most costly and difficult problems, and explains why -- in contrast to other sectors -- government tend to finance an increasing share of health care as incomes rise.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by World Bank in its series World Bank - Discussion Papers with number 339.

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    Length: 79 pages
    Date of creation: 1996
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fth:wobadi:339

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    Keywords: HEALTH; PUBLIC GOODS; GOVERNMENT;

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    Cited by:
    1. Patrick Guillaumont, 2011. "Aid effectiveness for poverty reduction:macroeconomic overview and emerging issues," Working Papers halshs-00554285, HAL.
    2. Thanasis Stengos & Brennan S. Thompson & Ximing Wu, 2009. "The Evolution of the Conditional Joint Distribution of Life Expectancy and Per Capita Income Growth," Working Papers 0901, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
    3. Carl Grekou & Romain Perez, 2014. "Child Mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: Why Public Health Spending Matters," EconomiX Working Papers 2014-28, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
    4. Farasat A.S. Bokhari & Yunwei Gai & Pablo Gottret, 2005. "Government Health Expenditures and Health Outcomes," Working Papers wp2005_02_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University, revised May 2006.

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