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Family Ties and Labor Markets in the United States and Brazil

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Author Info

  • Lam, D.
  • Schoeni, R.F.

Abstract

We use comparable surveys from Brazil and the United States to examine "vertical" and "horizontal" connections between families. Motivated by a model of assortative mating and intergenerational transmission of schooling and earnings, we include the schooling of relatives in male wage equations. We find that the effect of father-in-law's schooling is larger than the effect of father's schooling in Brazil, while the opposite is observed in the United States. We interpret these effects as indicators of unobservable worker characteristics, with differences in assortative mating and female labor market activity explaining the differences in the apparent effect of fathers and fathers-in-law in the two countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by RAND - Reprint Series in its series Papers with number 95-04.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 1995
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:randrs:95-04

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Related research

Keywords: FAMILY; LABOUR MARKET;

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Cited by:
  1. Nancy Birdsall & Jere R. Behrman & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Movilidad de la enseñanza intergeneracional y condiciones macro y políticas de enseñanza en América Latina," Research Department Publications 4145, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  2. Michael Kremer, 1996. "How Much Does Sorting Increase Inequality?," NBER Working Papers 5566, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Mano, Yukichi & Yamamura, Eiji, 2010. "Effects of Husband’s Education and Family Structure on Labor Force Participation and Married Japanese Women’s Earnings," MPRA Paper 23957, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Cecil Mlatsheni & Murray Leibbrandt, 2001. "The role of education and fertility in the participation and employment of African women in South Africa," Working Papers 01054, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
  5. Holmlund, Helena, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Assortative Mating. Effects of an Educational Reform," Working Paper Series 4/2006, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  6. Lisa K. Jepsen & Christopher A. Jepsen, . "An Empirical Analysis of Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Couples: Do "Likes" Still Like "Likes" in the '90s?," IPR working papers 99-5, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
  7. Nathan D. Grawe, 2010. "Bequest Receipt And Family Size Effects," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 48(1), pages 156-162, 01.
  8. Nancy Birdsall & Jere R. Behrman & Miguel Székely, 1998. "Intergenerational Schooling Mobility and Macro Conditions and Schooling Policies in Latin America," Research Department Publications 4144, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  9. Blanden, Joanne, 2005. "Love and Money: Intergenerational Mobility and Marital Matching on Parental Income," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005272e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  10. Yuanyuan Chen & Shuaizhang Feng, 2011. "Parental education and wages: Evidence from China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 568-591, December.
  11. Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K. & Jeng Lin, Chyongchiou, 1999. "Family background and returns to schooling in Taiwan," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 113-125, February.
  12. John Ermisch & Marco Francesconi & Thomas Siedler, 2004. "Intergenerational Economic Mobility and Assortative Mating," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 448, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  13. Blanden, Joanne, 2005. "Amour et argent : mobilite intergenerationnelle et appariement conjugal d'apres le revenu des parents," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2005272f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  14. Behrman, Jere R., 2010. "Investment in Education Inputs and Incentives," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
  15. Hirvonen, Lalaina, 2006. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility Among Daughters and Sons: Evidence from Sweden and a Comparison with the United States," Working Paper Series 5/2006, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
  16. repec:ese:iserwp:2002-23 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Diego Restuccia, 1998. "Technology Adoption and Schooling: Amplifier Income Effects of Policies Across Countries," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9810, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  18. Nathan Grawe, 2008. "The quality–quantity trade-off in fertility across parent earnings levels: a test for credit market failure," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 29-45, March.
  19. Chen, Yuanyuan & Feng, Shuaizhang, 2009. "Parental Education and Wages: Evidence from China," IZA Discussion Papers 4218, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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