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Financing Universal Health Care in the United States: A General Equilibrium Analysis of Efficiency and Distributional Effects

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Author Info

  • Ballard, C.L.
  • Goddeeris, J.H.

Abstract

We study the efficiency and distributional effects of financing universal health-insurance coverage, using a computational general equilibrium model of the United States for 1991, with considerable disaggregation among families. Aggregate efficiency losses (primarily from labor supply distortions) range from 0.2 percent to nearly 1 percent of net output. Losses are considerably smaller for a "mandate-with-tax-credit" plan than for full tax finance. All plans redistribute in favor of the poor. The mandate with credit is much better for the highest income groups, but worse for the lower-middle class. The elderly lose in all plans we consider.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Michigan State - Econometrics and Economic Theory in its series Papers with number 9104.

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Length: 49 pages
Date of creation: 1993
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:mistet:9104

Contact details of provider:
Postal: MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS, EAST LANSING MICHIGAN 48824 U.S.A.
Phone: 517.355.7583
Fax: 517.432.1068
Web page: http://econ.msu.edu/
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Related research

Keywords: health economics ; economic analysis;

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References

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  1. Martin Feldstein & Andrew Samwick, 1992. "Social Security Rules and Marginal Tax Rates," NBER Working Papers 3962, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Charles L. Ballard & Don Fullerton, 1993. "Distortionary Taxes and the Provision of Public Goods," NBER Working Papers 3506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Hanson, Kenneth & Golan, Elise H. & Vogel, Stephen J. & Olmsted, Jennifer, 2002. "Tracing The Impacts Of Food Assistance Programs On Agriculture And Consumers: A Computable General Equilibrium Model," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33831, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Parry, Ian W.H., 2005. "Comparing the welfare effects of public and private health care subsidies in the United Kingdom," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1191-1209, November.
  3. Parry, Ian, 2001. "On the Efficiency of Public and Private Health Care Systems: An Application to Alternative Health Policies in the United Kingdom," Discussion Papers dp-01-07, Resources For the Future.
  4. Hanson, Kenneth & Somwaru, Agapi, 2003. "Distributional Effects Of U.S. Farm Commodity Programs: Accounting For Farm And Non-Farm Households," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21944, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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