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Measuring Wage Growth Among Former Welfare Recipients

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Author Info

  • Card, D.
  • Michalopoulos, C.
  • Robins, P.K.

Abstract

We study the rate of wage growth among long-term welfare recipients in the self-sufficiency Project (SSP) who were induced by the financial incentives of the program to enter the work force. We find that single parents who began working in response to the SSP incentive are younger, less educated, have more young children, and have less positive attitudes toward work than those who would have been working regardless of the SSP.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Gouvernement du Canada - Human Resources Development in its series Papers with number 2001-5.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:cagohu:2001-5

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Canada; Coordination des publication, Direction generale de la recherche appliquee. Developpement des ressources humaine Canada. 4e etage, Phase V. 140 promenade du Portage. Hull , K1A 0J9
Fax: (819) 953-7260
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Web page: http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/
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Related research

Keywords: WAGES ; LABOUR MARKET ; SOCIAL WELFARE;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Bart Cockx & Christian Goebel & Stéphane Robin, 2013. "Can income support for part-time workers serve as a stepping-stone to regular jobs? An application to young long-term unemployed women," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 189-229, February.
  2. Lise, Jeremy & Seitz, Shannon & Smith, Jeffrey A., 2005. "Evaluating Search and Matching Models Using Experimental Data," IZA Discussion Papers 1717, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Lechner, Michael & Melly, Blaise, 2007. "Earnings Effects of Training Programs," IZA Discussion Papers 2926, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Cockx, Bart & Robin, Stéphane R. & Goebel, Christian, 2006. "Income Support Policies for Part-Time Workers: A Stepping-Stone to Regular Jobs? An Application to Young Long-Term Unemployed Women in Belgium," IZA Discussion Papers 2432, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Helen Connolly & Peter Gottschalk, 2000. "Differences in Wage Growth by Education Level: Do Less Educated Workers Gain Less from Work Experience?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 473, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 26 Aug 2006.
  6. Card, David, 2000. "Reforming the Financial Incentives of the Welfare System," IZA Discussion Papers 172, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Jeremy Lise & Shannon Seitz & Jeffrey Smith, 2004. "Equilibrium Policy Experiments and the Evaluation of Social Programs," NBER Working Papers 10283, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Richard Blundell & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2004. "Has 'In-Work' Benefit Reform Helped the Labor Market?," NBER Chapters, in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 411-460 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Michael Lechner & Blaise Melly, 2010. "Partial Idendification of Wage Effects of Training Programs," Working Papers 2010-8, Brown University, Department of Economics.

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