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A Revival of the Autoregressive Distributed Lag Model in Estimating Energy Demand Relationships

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Author Info

  • Bentzen, J.
  • Engsted, T.

Abstract

The findings in the recent energy economic literature that energy economic variables are non-stationary, heve led to an implicit or explicit dismissal of the standard autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model in estimating energy demand relationships. However, Pesaran and Shin (1997) show that the ARDL model remains valid when the underlying variables are non-stationary, provided the variables are cointegrated. In this paper we use the ARDL approach to estimated a demand relationship for Danish residential energy consumption, and the ARDL estimates are compared to the estimates obtained using cointegration techniques and error-correction models (ECMs). It turns out that both quantitavely and qualitatively, the ARDL approach and the cointegration/ECM approach give very similar results.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Aarhus School of Business - Department of Economics in its series Papers with number 99-7.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:aascbu:99-7

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Postal: Department of Economics, Faculty of Business Administration. The Aarhus School of Business. Fuglesangs Alle 4. DK- 8210 Aarhus V - Denmark
Phone: +45 89 486396
Fax: +45 8615 5175
Web page: http://www.asb.dk/about/departments/nat.aspx
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Keywords: ENERGY ; ECONOMIC MODELS ; ECONOMETRICS;

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Cited by:
  1. Theologos Dergiades & Lefteris Tsoulfidis, 2011. "Revisiting residential demand for electricity in Greece: new evidence from the ARDL approach to cointegration analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 511-531, October.
  2. Theodoros Zachariadis & Nicoletta Pashourtidou, 2006. "An Empirical analysis of electricity consumption in Cyprus," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 4-2006, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  3. Olusegun A. Omisakin & Oluwatosin A. Adeniyi & Abimbola M. Oyinlola, 2012. "Structural Breaks, Parameter Stability and Energy Demand Modeling in Nigeria," International Journal of Economic Sciences and Applied Research (IJESAR), Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Kavala, Greece, vol. 5(2), pages 129-144, August.
  4. Jebaraj, S. & Iniyan, S., 2006. "A review of energy models," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 281-311, August.
  5. Scott, K. Rebecca, 2011. "Demand and price volatility: rational habits in international gasoline demand," CUDARE Working Paper Series 1122, University of California at Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Policy.
  6. Erdogdu, Erkan, 2007. "Electricity demand analysis using cointegration and ARIMA modelling: A case study of Turkey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 1129-1146, February.
  7. Olusegun A. Omisakin & Abimbola M. Oyinlola & Oluwatosin A. Adeniyi, 2012. "Modeling Gasoline Demand with Structural Breaks:New Evidence from Nigeria," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-9.
  8. Ping-Yu Chen & Chia-Lin Chang & Chi-Chung Chen & Michael McAleer, 2010. "Modeling the Effect of Oil Price on Global Fertilizer Prices," Working Papers in Economics 10/55, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  9. Wei Yu & Baizhan Li & Yarong Lei & Meng Liu, 2011. "Analysis of a Residential Building Energy Consumption Demand Model," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(3), pages 475-487, March.
  10. Andrea Bigano & Francesco Bosello & Giuseppe Marano, 2006. "Energy Demand and Temperature: A Dynamic Panel Analysis," Working Papers 2006.112, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  11. Halicioglu, Ferda, 2011. "A dynamic econometric study of income, energy and exports in Turkey," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 3348-3354.
  12. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chiu, Yi-Bin, 2011. "Electricity demand elasticities and temperature: Evidence from panel smooth transition regression with instrumental variable approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 896-902, September.
  13. Dagher, Leila, 2012. "Natural gas demand at the utility level: An application of dynamic elasticities," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 961-969.
  14. Chien-Chung Nieh & Yu-Shan Wang, 2005. "ARDL Approach to the Exchange Rate Overshooting in Taiwan," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 55-71, August.
  15. Biru Paul & Md. Uddin & Abdullah Noman, 2011. "Remittances and output in Bangladesh: an ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration," International Review of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 229-242, June.
  16. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Lee, Jun-De, 2009. "Energy prices, multiple structural breaks, and efficient market hypothesis," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 86(4), pages 466-479, April.

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