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Empirical Evidence on the Publicness of State Legislative Activities

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Author Info

  • Holcombe, R.G.
  • Sobel, R.S.

Abstract

Legislation would be a Samuelsonian public good if the cost of creating legislation is not a function of the number of people covered by the legislation. A straightforward test of Samuelsonian publicness is undertaken by estimating the cost of producing legislation as a function of population and other variables using cross-sectional data from the states of the United States for the years 1965, 1975, and 1985. The empirical results indicate that, while legislation does have some degree of publicness, legislation is mostly a private good and that it has been becoming increasingly less public over time. Copyright 1995 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Florida State University in its series Working Papers with number 1993_05_03.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: 1993
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fsu:wpaper:1993_05_03

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Keywords: legislation;

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Cited by:
  1. James LeSage & Matthew Dominguez, 2012. "The importance of modeling spatial spillovers in public choice analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 525-545, March.
  2. Robert Breunig & Yvon Rocaboy, 2008. "Per-capita public expenditures and population size: a non-parametric analysis using French data," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 136(3), pages 429-445, September.
  3. Anabel Zárate-Marco & Jaime Vallés-Giménez, 2012. "The cost of regulation in a decentralized context: the case of the Spanish regions," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 185-203, February.
  4. Traub, Stefan, 2006. "The Provision of Local Public Services in a Risky Environment: An Application to Crime," Economics Working Papers 2006,03, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
  5. John Hudson & Philip Jones, 2005. "“Public goods”: An exercise in calibration," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 124(3), pages 267-282, September.
  6. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 1997. "The selection principle and market failure in systems competition," Munich Reprints in Economics 19854, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Christoph Sauer & Margit Schratzenstaller, 2002. "Strategies Of International Fiscal Competition For Foreign Direct Investment In A Model With Impure Public Inputs," Departmental Discussion Papers 115, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.

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