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Nutrition Knowledge, Household Coping, and the Demand for Micronutrient-Rich Foods

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  • Steven Block

Abstract

This study applies both parametric and non-parametric techniques to a new household data set from rural Indonesia to explain previous findings of a reduced-form relationship between nutrition knowledge and child micronutrient status. Households of mothers with and without nutrition knowledge allocate identical budget shares to food; yet, within the food budget,  knowledge households allocate substantially larger shares to micronutrient-rich foods and smaller chares to rice than do  non-knowledge households. Knowledge households are also less willing to sacrifice consumption of micronutrient-rich foods in the face of increased staple food prices than are non-knowledge households. Differences are not attributable to differences in maternal schooling.

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File URL: http://www.nutrition.tufts.edu/documents/fpan/wp20-demand_params.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in its series Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition with number 20.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fsn:wpaper:20

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Web page: http://www.nutrition.tufts.edu
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Keywords: Child nutrition; Indonesia; education; regulation;

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  1. Paul Glewwe, 1999. "Why Does Mother's Schooling Raise Child Health in Developing Countries? Evidence from Morocco," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 124-159.
  2. Jayachandran N. Variyam & James Blaylock & Biing-Hwan Lin & Katherine Ralston & David Smallwood, 1999. "Mother's Nutrition Knowledge and Children's Dietary Intakes," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(2), pages 373-384.
  3. Sonalde Desai & Soumya Alva, 1998. "Maternal education and child health: Is there a strong causal relationship?," Demography, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 71-81, February.
  4. Behrman, Jere R. & Wolfe, Barbara L., 1987. "How does mother's schooling affect family health, nutrition, medical care usage, and household sanitation?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 185-204.
  5. Lavy, Victor & Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan & de Vreyer, Philippe, 1996. "Quality of health care, survival and health outcomes in Ghana," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 333-357, June.
  6. Steven A. Block & Lynnda Keiss & Patrick Webb & S. Kosen & Regina Moench-Pfanner & Martin W. Bloem & C. Peter Timmer, 2002. "Did Indonesia's Cries of 1997/98 Affect Child Nutrition? A Cohort Decomposition Analysis of National Nutrition Surveillance Data," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 05, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
  7. Behrman, Jere R. & Deolalikar, Anil B., 1988. "Health and nutrition," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 631-711 Elsevier.
  8. Behrman, Jere R. & Wolfe, Barbara L., 1984. "More evidence on nutrition demand : Income seems overrated and women's schooling underemphasized," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 105-128.
  9. Christiaensen, Luc & Alderman, Harold, 2004. "Child Malnutrition in Ethiopia: Can Maternal Knowledge Augment the Role of Income?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(2), pages 287-312, January.
  10. Barrera, Albino, 1990. "The role of maternal schooling and its interaction with public health programs in child health production," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 69-91, January.
  11. Alderman, Harold & Garcia, Marito, 1994. "Food Security and Health Security: Explaining the Levels of Nutritional Status in Pakistan," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42(3), pages 485-507, April.
  12. Steven Block, 2002. "Nutrition Knowledge Versus Schooling in the Demand for Child Micronutrient Status," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 10, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
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