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Review of input and output policies for cereals production in Pakistan:

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  • Salam, Abdul

Abstract

The marketing of farm inputs and outputs has become a major problem for farmers in Pakistan. Farm input supplies are irregular, characterized by shortages and high prices at critical times. This report reviews the input and output policies for cereals implemented in Pakistan during the period 1996–2010. Pakistan has a long and varied history of intervening in farm input and output markets, going back decades before the period under review. Most significantly, in the wake of economic reforms launched during the 1980s, it has withdrawn from most of the commodity markets except wheat. In other commodity markets, intervention is by and large notional and without much practical involvement. The rolling back of the public sector from markets has certainly saved public funds, but the savings have come at a cost. Some of the cost, in terms of higher prices and variability stemming from the uncertain economic environment and supply, is borne by consumers, and some, in terms of lower producer prices at harvest, is borne by farmers, especially small and medium farmers, whose farms account for more than 50 percent of the area under cereals.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1223.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1223

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Keywords: Cereal crops; cereal production; Agriculture; food security; Markets; price policies; Research and development; Price support; Agricultural research; research system; distortion; Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA);

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  1. Abdul Salam, 1981. "Farm Tractorization, Fertilizer Use and Productivity of Mexican Wheatin Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 20(3), pages 323-345.
  2. Paul Dorosh & Abdul Salam, 2006. "Wheat Markets and Price Stabilisation in Pakistan : An Analysis of Policy Options," Microeconomics Working Papers 22188, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  3. Beintema, Nienke M. & Stads, Gert-Jan, 2008. "Agricultural R&D capacity and investments in the Asia–Pacific region:," Research briefs 11, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Rashid, Shahidur & Gulati, Ashok & Cummings, Ralph Jr., 2008. "From parastatals to private trade: Lessons from Asian agriculture," Issue briefs 50, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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