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Trading in turbulent times: Smallholder maize marketing in the southern highlands, Tanzania

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Author Info

  • Van Campenhout, Bjorn
  • Lecoutere, Els
  • D'Exelle, Ben

Abstract

The short-run effects of the 2007/2008 global food crisis on semisubsistence farmers' well-being in low-income countries depends on whether they are net sellers or net buyers of the affected commodities. Realizing that farmers face volatile prices over the course of an agricultural year, we analyze the timing of sales and purchases of maize. In addition, in our analysis, we depart from the oft-made assumption that farmers in rural villages are perfectly integrated within the wider economy. Comparing our results with a static analysis, we find that especially-poor farmers face greater losses from the maize food price crisis than others. The welfare impact is likely to be even more severe than previously thought, as the crisis hurts large households with relatively large numbers of children and women most. We also analyze the effects of factors that are likely to affect potential benefits from intertemporal and spatial price dispersion, such as means of transport, access to price information, and credit.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1099.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1099

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Keywords: Food prices; intertemporal arbitrage; Market participation; spatial price dispersion;

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References

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  1. Todd Benson & Samuel Mugarura & Kelly Wanda, 2008. "Impacts in Uganda of rising global food prices: the role of diversified staples and limited price transmission," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 513-524, November.
  2. Rashid, Shahidur, 2002. "Dynamics of agricultural wage and rice price in Bangladesh," MTID discussion papers 44, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Minot, Nicholas, 2011. "Transmission of world food price changes to markets in Sub-Saharan Africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1059, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Maros Ivanic & Will Martin, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries-super-1," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 405-416, November.
  5. Jayne, T.S. & Zulu, Ballard & Nijhoff, J.J., 2006. "Stabilizing food markets in eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 328-341, August.
  6. Mitchell, Donald, 2008. "A note on rising food prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4682, The World Bank.
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Cited by:
  1. Yamauchi, Futoshi & Liu, Yanyan, 2011. "Impacts of an early education intervention on students' learning achievement: Evidence from the Philippines," IFPRI discussion papers 1121, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Zambrano, Patricia & Maldonado, Jorge H. & Mendoza, Sandra L. & Ruiz, Lorena & Fonseca, Luz Amparo & Cardona, Iván, 2011. "Women cotton farmers: Their perceptions and experiences with transgenic varieties: A case study for Colombia," IFPRI discussion papers 1118, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. de Brauw, Alan & Gilligan, Daniel, 2011. "Using the regression discontinuity design with implicit partitions: The impacts of comunidades solidarias rurales on schooling in El Salvador," IFPRI discussion papers 1116, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Van Campenhout, Bjorn & Pauw, Karl & Minot, Nicholas, 2013. "The impact of food prices shocks in Uganda: First-order versus long-run effects:," IFPRI discussion papers 1284, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Cai, Ximing & Yang, Yi-Chen E. & Zhao, Jianshi & Ringler, Claudia, 2011. "Can water allocation in the Yellow River basin be improved?: Insights from a multi-agent system model," IFPRI discussion papers 1117, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Prasad, Sanjay K. & Pullabhotla, Hemant & Ganesh-Kumar, A., 2011. "Supply and demand for cereals in Nepal, 2010–2030:," IFPRI discussion papers 1120, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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