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Improved fallows in Kenya: history, farmer practice, and impacts

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  • Place, Frank
  • Franzel, Steve
  • Noordin, Qureish
  • Jama, Bashir

Abstract

This case study explores the development, dissemination, adoption, and impact of improved tree fallows in rural western Kenya. The processes of technology development and dissemination throughout the region are described and analyzed. To analyze adoption and impact, the paper applies a variety of different data collection methods as well as samples from both pilot areas where researchers maintained a significant presence and non-pilot areas where farmers learned of the technologies through other channels. Sample sizes for the quantitative analysis ranged from almost 2,000 households for measuring the adoption process to just over 100 households for measuring impact indicators. Qualitative methods included long-term case studies for 40 households and focus group discussions involving 16 different groups. The paper describes the ways in which farmers used and modified improved fallow practices. Discussion also examines the types of households using fallows and benefiting from their use.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series EPTD discussion papers with number 115.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:eptddp:115

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  1. Swinkels, R.A. & Franzel, S. & Shepherd, K.D. & Ohlsson, E. & Ndufa, J.K., 1997. "The economics of short rotation improved fallows: evidence from areas of high population density in Western Kenya," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 99-121, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Kelly, Valerie A., 2005. "Farmers' Demand for Fertilizer in Sub-Saharan Africa," Staff Papers 11612, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Kirumba, E.G. & Pinard, F., 2010. "Determinants of farmers’ compliance with coffee eco-certification standards in Mt. Kenya region," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 95970, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  3. Place, Frank & Barrett, Christopher B. & Freeman, H. Ade & Ramisch, Joshua J. & Vanlauwe, Bernard, 2003. "Prospects for integrated soil fertility management using organic and inorganic inputs: evidence from smallholder African agricultural systems," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 365-378, August.

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