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Opening and Closing the Market: Evidence from the London Stock Exchange

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  • Hyun Song Shin

    ()

  • Ian Tonks

    ()

  • Andrew Ellul

Abstract

Various markets, particularly NASDAQ, have been under pressure from regulators and market participants to introduce call auctions for their opening and closing periods. We investigate the performance of call markets at the open and close from a unique natural experiment provided by the institutional structure of the London Stock Exchange. As well as a call auction, there is a parallel ¶off-exchange¶ dealership system at both the market's open and close. Although the call market dominates the dealership system in terms of price discovery, we find that the call suffers from a high failure rate to open and close trading, especially on days characterized by difficult trading conditions. In particular, the call's trading costs increase significantly when (a) asymmetric information is high, (b) trading is expected to be slow, (c) order flow is unbalanced, and (d) uncertainty is high. Furthermore, traders' resort to call auctions is negatively correlated with firm size, implying that the call auction is not the optimal method for opening and closing trading of medium and small sized stocks. We suggest that these results can be explained by thick market externalities.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Financial Markets Group in its series FMG Discussion Papers with number dp506.

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Date of creation: Jul 2004
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Handle: RePEc:fmg:fmgdps:dp506

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  1. Bruno Biais & Pierre Hillion & Chester Spatt, 1999. "Price Discovery and Learning during the Preopening Period in the Paris Bourse," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(6), pages 1218-1248, December.
  2. Michael J. Barclay, 2003. "Price Discovery and Trading After Hours," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 16(4), pages 1041-1073.
  3. Lin, Ji-Chai & Sanger, Gary C & Booth, G Geoffrey, 1995. "Trade Size and Components of the Bid-Ask Spread," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 8(4), pages 1153-83.
  4. Madhavan, Ananth, 1992. " Trading Mechanisms in Securities Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 607-41, June.
  5. Madhavan, Ananth & Panchapagesan, Venkatesh, 2000. "Price Discovery in Auction Markets: A Look Inside the Black Box," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 13(3), pages 627-58.
  6. Pagano, Marco, 1989. "Trading Volume and Asset Liquidity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 104(2), pages 255-74, May.
  7. P. Diamond, 1980. "Aggregate Demand Management in Search Equilibrium," Working papers 268, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  8. Charles Cao & Eric Ghysels & Frank Hatheway, 2000. "Price Discovery without Trading: Evidence from the Nasdaq Preopening," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(3), pages 1339-1365, 06.
  9. Kjell G. Nyborg & Kristian Rydqvist & Suresh M. Sundaresan, 2002. "Bidder Behavior in Multiunit Auctions: Evidence from Swedish Treasury Auctions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 394-424, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Chang, Rosita P. & Rhee, S. Ghon & Stone, Gregory R. & Tang, Ning, 2008. "How does the call market method affect price efficiency? Evidence from the Singapore Stock Market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 2205-2219, October.
  2. Chakrabarty, Bidisha & Corwin, Shane A. & Panayides, Marios A., 2011. "When a halt is not a halt: An analysis of off-NYSE trading during NYSE market closures," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 361-386, July.
  3. Carole Comerton-Forde & James Rydge & Hayley Burridge, 2007. "Not all call auctions are created equal: evidence from Hong Kong," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 395-413, November.
  4. Gernot Hinterleitner & Philipp Hornung & Ulrike Leopold-Wildburger & Roland Mestel & Stefan Palan, 2012. "A Good Beginning Makes a Good Market: The Effect of Different Market Opening Structures on Market Quality," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2012-01, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
  5. Andreas Andrikopoulos & Timotheos Angelidis, 2008. "Idiosyncratic risk, returns and liquidity in the London Stock Exchange: a spillover approach," Working Papers 0017, University of Peloponnese, Department of Economics.
  6. Pagano, Michael S. & Peng, Lin & Schwartz, Robert A., 2008. "The quality of price formation at market openings and closings: Evidence from the Nasdaq stock market," CFS Working Paper Series 2008/45, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  7. Susan Thomas, 2010. "Call auctions : A solution to some difficulties in Indian finance," Finance Working Papers 23028, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  8. Chen, Tao & Cai, Jun & Ho, Richard Y.K., 2009. "Intraday information efficiency on the Chinese equity market," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 527-541, September.
  9. Menkveld, Albert J., 2006. "Splitting orders in overlapping markets: a study of cross-listed stocks," Serie Research Memoranda 0003, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
  10. Chelley-Steeley, Patricia L., 2008. "Market quality changes in the London Stock Market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(10), pages 2248-2253, October.
  11. Pagano, Michael S. & Peng, Lin & Schwartz, Robert A., 2013. "A call auction's impact on price formation and order routing: Evidence from the NASDAQ stock market," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 331-361.
  12. Kandel, Eugene & Rindi, Barbara & Bosetti, Luisella, 2012. "The effect of a closing call auction on market quality and trading strategies," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 23-49.

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