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Earthquake fatalities: the interaction of nature and political economy

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Author Info

  • Nejat Anbarci

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Florida International University)

  • Monica Escaleras

    (Department of Economics and Finance, College of Charleston)

  • Charles A. Register

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Florida Atlantic University)

Abstract

In our theoretical model, we show that as per capita income decreases and the level of inequality increases, different segments of society are less likely to agree on the distribution of the burden of the necessary collective action, causing the relatively-wealthy simply to self-insure against the disaster while leaving the relatively-poor to its mercy. We then evaluate 269 large earthquakes occurring worldwide (1960-2002), taking into account other factors such as an earthquake's magnitude, depth and proximity to population centers. Using a Negative Binomial estimation strategy with both random and fixed estimators, we find strong evidence of the theoretical model’s predictions.

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File URL: http://casgroup.fiu.edu/pages/docs/2245/1280267980_04-15.pdf
File Function: First version, 2004
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Florida International University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0415.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2004
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming in Journal of Public Economics
Handle: RePEc:fiu:wpaper:0415

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Phone: (305) 348-2316
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Web page: http://casgroup.fiu.edu/Economics/
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Keywords: Earthquake; Fatalities; Nature; Political economy;

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