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The cyclicality of the user cost of labor with search and matching

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  • Marianna Kudlyak

Abstract

The user cost of labor captures the hiring wage and the expected effect of the economic conditions at the time of hiring on future wages. In search and matching models, I show that it is the user cost and not the wage that is weighted against the worker's marginal product at the time of hiring; so, the user cost is the allocational variable. I construct its measure in the data and estimate that it is more procyclical than average wages or wages of newly hired workers. I show that the textbook search and matching model cannot simultaneously generate the empirical elasticities of the vacancy-unemployment ratio and of the user cost of labor, irrespectively of the surplus division rule.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond in its series Working Paper with number 09-12.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrwp:09-12

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Related research

Keywords: Business cycles ; Labor market;

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Cited by:
  1. Leena Rudanko, 2010. "Aggregate and Idiosyncratic Risk in a Frictional Labor Market," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2010-054, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  2. Leena Rudanko, 2008. "Labor Market Dynamics under Long Term Wage Contracting," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series wp2008-003, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  3. Martins, Pedro S. & Solon, Gary & Thomas, Jonathan P., 2010. "Measuring What Employers Really Do about Entry Wages over the Business Cycle," IZA Discussion Papers 4757, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Eliaz, Kfir & Spiegler, Rani, 2012. "Reference Dependence and Labor-Market Fluctuations," CEPR Discussion Papers 8997, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Michael W. Elsby & Donggyun Shin & Gary Solon, 2013. "Wage Adjustment in the Great Recession," NBER Working Papers 19478, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Marianna Kudlyak, 2012. "Housing services price inflation," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue 3Q, pages 185-207.
  7. James Malcomson & Sophocles Mavroeidis, 2010. "Nash Bargaining, Credible Bargaining and Efficiency Wages in a Matching Model for the US," Economics Series Working Papers 511, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  8. Pedro S. Martins & Gary Solon & Jonathan P. Thomas, 2012. "Measuring What Employers Do about Entry Wages over the Business Cycle: A New Approach," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 36-55, October.

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