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Market declines: Is banning short selling the solution?

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  • Robert Battalio
  • Hamid Mehran
  • Paul Schultz

Abstract

In response to the sharp decline in prices of financial stocks in the fall of 2008, regulators in a number of countries banned short selling of particular stocks and industries. Evidence suggests that these bans did little to stop the slide in stock prices, but significantly increased costs of liquidity. In August 2011, the U.S. market experienced a large decline when Standard and Poor’s announced a downgrade of U.S. debt. Our cross-sectional tests suggest that the decline in stock prices was not significantly driven or amplified by short selling. Short selling does not appear to be the root cause of recent stock market declines. Furthermore, banning short selling does not appear to prevent stock prices from falling when firm-specific or economy-wide economic fundamentals are weak, and may impose high costs on market participants.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its series Staff Reports with number 518.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:518

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Related research

Keywords: Stock - Prices ; Liquidity (Economics) ; Credit ratings;

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  1. Beber, Alessandro & Pagano, Marco, 2009. "Short-Selling Bans around the World: Evidence from the 2007-09 Crisis," CEPR Discussion Papers 7557, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Asquith, Paul & Pathak, Parag A. & Ritter, Jay R., 2005. "Short interest, institutional ownership, and stock returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(2), pages 243-276, November.
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