Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Market liquidity and trader welfare in multiple dealer markets: evidence from dual trading restrictions

Contents:

Author Info

  • Peter R. Locke
  • Asani Sarkar
  • Lifan Wu

Abstract

Dual trading is the practice whereby futures floor traders execute trades both for their own and customers' accounts on the same day. We provide evidence, in the context of restrictions on dual trading, that aggregate liquidity measures, such as the average bid-ask spread, may be misleading indicators of traders' welfare in markets with multiple, heterogeneously skilled dealers. In our theoretical model, hedgers and informed customers trade through futures floor traders of different skill levels: more skilled floor traders attract more hedgers to trade. We show that customers' welfare and dual trader revenues are increasing in the skill level and, so, a restriction on dual trading is welfare-reducing for customers of dual traders with above-average skill levels. Yet, our results further show, the restriction may leave market depth unchanged if the difference in average skill levels between dual traders and pure brokers in not large. ; We empirically study two episodes of dual trading restrictions and find that dual traders were heterogeneous with respect to their personal trading skills. Further, although the average realized bid-ask spread was unchanged in both these episodes, restrictions may have hurt dual traders of above-average skills and their customers. Specifically, we find that dual traders with above-average skills may have quit brokerage and switched to trading for their own accounts following restrictions, as conjectured by Grossman (1989).

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.newyorkfed.org/research/staff_reports/research_papers/9721.html
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.newyorkfed.org/research/staff_reports/research_papers/9721.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its series Research Paper with number 9721.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fednrp:9721

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 33 Liberty Street, New York, NY 10045-0001
Email:
Web page: http://www.newyorkfed.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Futures ; Hedging (Finance) ; Liquidity (Economics);

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Leuthold, Raymond M & Garcia, Philip & Lu, Richard, 1994. "The Returns and Forecasting Ability of Large Traders in the Frozen Pork Bellies Futures Market," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67(3), pages 459-73, July.
  2. Grossman, S.J. & Miller, M.H., 1988. "Liquidity And Market Structure," Papers 88, Princeton, Department of Economics - Financial Research Center.
  3. Sarkar Asani, 1995. "Dual Trading: Winners, Losers, and Market Impact," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 77-93, January.
  4. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1993. "Assessing the Quality of a Security Market: A New Approach to Transaction-Cost Measurement," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(1), pages 191-212.
  5. Spiegel, Matthew & Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1992. "Informed Speculation and Hedging in a Noncompetitive Securities Market," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(2), pages 307-29.
  6. Hun Y. Park & Asani Sarkar & Lifan Wu, 1998. "Do Brokers Misallocate Customer Trades? Evidence From Futures Markets," Finance 9801002, EconWPA.
  7. Bacidore, Jeffrey M., 1997. "The Impact of Decimalization on Market Quality: An Empirical Investigation of the Toronto Stock Exchange," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 92-120, April.
  8. Fishman, Michael J & Longstaff, Francis A, 1992. " Dual Trading in Futures Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 643-71, June.
  9. Christie, William G & Schultz, Paul H, 1994. " Why Do NASDAQ Market Makers Avoid Odd-Eighth Quotes?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(5), pages 1813-40, December.
  10. Peter R. Locke & Asani Sarkar, 1996. "Volatility and liquidity in futures markets," Research Paper 9612, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  11. Sanford J. Grossman, . "An Economic Analysis of Dual Trading," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 33-89, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  12. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-35, November.
  13. Roell, Ailsa, 1990. "Dual-capacity trading and the quality of the market," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 105-124, June.
  14. Lee, Charles M C, 1993. " Market Integration and Price Execution for NYSE-Listed Securities," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 1009-38, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Chakravarty, Sugato & Li, Kai, 2003. "A Bayesian analysis of dual trader informativeness in futures markets," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 355-371, May.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fednrp:9721. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Amy Farber).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.