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American employer salary surveys and labor economics research: issues and contributions

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  • Erica Groshen

Abstract

This paper reviews the uses of U.S. employer salary surveys for labor market research. Recent computational, theoretical, and econometric advances render these surveys ripe for exploitation. It summarize theories of employer wage effects and then describe salary surveys and their preparation for analysis. Then, the surveys and the methodological issues they raise are contrasted with household data. Finally, the paper summarizes the techniques used and contributions made in some salary survey-based studies.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its series Research Paper with number 9604.

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Date of creation: 1996
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednrp:9604

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Keywords: Labor market ; Wages;

References

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  1. Erica L. Groshen, 1991. "The Structure of the Female/Male Wage Differential: Is It Who You Are, What You Do, or Where You Work?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(3), pages 457-472.
  2. Abowd, J.M. & Kramarz, F. & Margolis, D.N., 1995. "High-Wage Workers and High-Wage Firms," Cahiers de recherche 9503, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
  3. Groshen, Erica L, 1991. "Sources of Intra-industry Wage Dispersion: How Much Do Employers Matter?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 106(3), pages 869-84, August.
  4. William T. Dickens & Lawrence F. Katz, 1987. "Inter-Industry Wage Differences and Theories of Wage Determination," NBER Working Papers 2271, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Erica L. Groshen, 1991. "Rising inequality in a salary survey: another piece of the puzzle," Working Paper 9121, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  6. Leonard, Jonathan S & Jacobson, Louis, 1990. "Earnings Inequality and Job Turnover," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 298-302, May.
  7. Erica L. Groshen & Alan B. Krueger, 1990. "The structure of supervision and pay in hospitals," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 43(3), pages 134-146, February.
  8. Bulow, Jeremy I & Summers, Lawrence H, 1986. "A Theory of Dual Labor Markets with Application to Industrial Policy,Discrimination, and Keynesian Unemployment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages 376-414, July.
  9. Gokhale, Jagadeesh & Groshen, Erica L & Neumark, David, 1995. "Do Hostile Takeovers Reduce Extramarginal Wage Payments?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(3), pages 470-85, August.
  10. Levine, David I, 1993. "Fairness, Markets, and Ability to Pay: Evidence from Compensation Executives," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1241-59, December.
  11. Brown, Charles & Medoff, James, 1989. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1027-59, October.
  12. Salop, Steven C, 1979. "A Model of the Natural Rate of Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 117-25, March.
  13. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-81, September.
  14. Akerlof, George A, 1981. "Jobs as Dam Sites," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1), pages 37-49, January.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Abowd, John M. & Kramarz, Francis, 1999. "Econometric analyses of linked employer-employee data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 53-74, March.
  2. Diego Comin & Erica L. Groshen & Bess Rabin, 2006. "Turbulent Firms, Turbulent Wages?," NBER Working Papers 12032, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Erica L. Groshen & Mark E. Schweitzer, 1997. "Identifying inflation's grease and sand effects in the labor market," Staff Reports 31, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Erica Groshen & David Levine, 1998. "The rise and decline(?) of U.S. internal labor markets," Research Paper 9819, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  5. Simon, Hipolito, 2005. "Employer wage differentials from an international perspective," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 284-288, August.
  6. Hübler, Olaf, 2005. "Panel Data Econometrics: Modelling and Estimation," Diskussionspapiere der Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Leibniz Universität Hannover dp-319, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.

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