Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The demand for money by firms: some additional empirical results

Contents:

Author Info

  • Casey B. Mulligan

Abstract

COMPUSTAT data on 12,000 firms for the years 1956-1992 indicate that large firms hold less cash as a percentage of sales than do small ones. Whether comparisons are made within or across industries, the elasticity of cash balances with respect to sales is about 0.75. Firms headquartered in counties with high wages hold more money for a given level of sales, a finding consistent with the idea that time can substitute for money in the provision of transactions services. The estimates are consistent with both scale economies in the holding of money and secular declines in velocity.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://minneapolisfed.org/research/common/pub_detail.cfm?pb_autonum_id=659
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://minneapolisfed.org/research/DP/DP125.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis in its series Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics with number 125.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmem:125

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 90 Hennepin Avenue, P.O. Box 291, Minneapolis, MN 55480-0291
Phone: (612) 204-5000
Web page: http://minneapolisfed.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:
Web: http://www.minneapolisfed.org/pubs/

Related research

Keywords: Cash management;

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Allan H. Meltzer, 1963. "The Demand for Money: The Evidence from the Time Series," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 71, pages 219.
  2. Milton Friedman, 1957. "A Theory of the Consumption Function," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie57-1.
  3. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  4. Edward L. Whalen, 1965. "A Cross‐Section Study Of Business Demand For Cash," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 20(3), pages 423-443, 09.
  5. King, Robert G., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 169-172, January.
  6. Faig, Miquel, 1988. "Characterization of the optimal tax on money when it functions as a medium of exchange," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 137-148, July.
  7. Feenstra, Robert C., 1986. "Functional equivalence between liquidity costs and the utility of money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 271-291, March.
  8. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1996. "Adoption of Financial Technologies: Implications for Money Demand and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 5504, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. anonymous, 1971. "Survey of demand deposit ownership," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Jun, pages 456-467.
  10. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1992. "U.S. Money Demand: Surprising Cross-Sectional Estimates," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(2), pages 285-343.
  11. Cecily C. Garver & Lawrence J. Radecki, 1987. "The household demand for money: estimates from cross-sectional data," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Spr, pages 29-34.
  12. Karni, Edi, 1973. "The Transactions Demand for Cash: Incorporation of the Value of Time into the Inventory Approach," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(5), pages 1216-25, Sept.-Oct.
  13. Hiroshi Fujiki & Casey B. Mulligan, 1996. "Production, Financial Sophistication, and the Demand for Money by Households and Firms," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 14(1), pages 65-103, July.
  14. Fischer, Stanley, 1974. "Money and the Production Function," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(4), pages 517-33, December.
  15. Zvi Griliches & Jerry A. Hausman, 1984. "Errors in Variables in Panel Data," NBER Technical Working Papers 0037, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. William J. Frazer & Jr., 1964. "The Financial Structure of Manufacturing Corporations and the Demand for Money: Some Empirical Findings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72, pages 176.
  17. Edgar L. Feige, 1964. "The Demand For Liquid Assets: A Temporal Cross‐Section Analysis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 19(1), pages 116-117, 03.
  18. Lucas, Robert E., 1988. "Money demand in the United States: A quantitative review," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 137-167, January.
  19. Bomberger, William A, 1993. "Income, Wealth, and Household Demand for Deposits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 1034-44, September.
  20. Mulligan, Casey B, 1997. "Scale Economies, the Value of Time, and the Demand for Money: Longitudinal Evidence from Firms," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 1061-79, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Casey B. Mulligan & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1997. "The optimum quantity of money: Theory and evidence," Economics Working Papers 229, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  2. Francesca Lotti & Juri Marcucci, 2006. "Revisiting the empirical evidence on firmsÂ’ money demand," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 595, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  3. Peng-fei Wang & Yi Wen, 2005. "Another look at sticky prices and output persistence," Working Papers 2005-051, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  4. Bover, Olympia & Watson, Nadine, 2001. "Are there Economies of Scale in the Demand for Money by Firms? Some Panel Data Estimates," CEPR Discussion Papers 2818, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Andreas M. Fischer, 2006. "Measuring Income Elasticity for Swiss Money Demand: What do the Cantons say about Financial Innovation?," Working Papers 2006-01, Swiss National Bank.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedmem:125. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Janelle Ruswick).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.